Alumni

Companies say affiliates program nets them recruits, interns, and deeper ties with CEE

Students wait to meet with company representatives at the 2016 School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Career Expo. Among the firms that had success recruiting at the event were ARCADIS and Skanska, who were inaugural members of the School’s Corporate Affiliates Program and had prominent placement at the expo. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

For Adam Gersh, the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Corporate Affiliates Program has been about efficiency. For Jimmy Mitchell, being a corporate affiliate of the School has been about relationships.

Monday, June 19, 2017

Alumni Calhoun, Vecellio named fellows of the National Academy of Construction

Alumni Leo Vecellio and Bill Calhoun have been selected as fellows of the National Academy of Construction. (Photos Courtesy: Vecellio Group and Clark Construction)

The National Academy of Construction has honored two School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni as part of its 2017 fellowship class, Bill Calhoun Jr. and Leo Vecellio Jr.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Journal names Ivey’s paper on sourcing and counting pollution from atmospheric reactions the best of 2016

A paper that grew from Cesunica Ivey's doctoral research in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering has been named one of the two best papers in Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering for 2016. The article outlines a new way to estimate the amount and source of secondary PM2.5 pollution in the air.

Cesunica Ivey’s paper outlining a new way to estimate the amount and source of air pollution has been named one of the two best articles published in 2016 in the journal Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Alumni-founded company pioneers a new way to keep the water flowing in rural communities

A company founded by Georgia Tech students is pioneering a new model for helping rural communities in developing countries maintain — and sustain — water security.

For water to come flowing clear and clean from the tap, a lot has to go right. In the United States and other developed countries, people largely take for granted that all systems — mechanical, electrical, structural, and chemical — are go. And if they aren’t, someone can and will quickly determine what went wrong and get it fixed. But in many areas around the world, it’s a different story.

Monday, May 22, 2017

These two alumni help make Atlanta’s everyday commute better, saving drivers time and money

Traffic moves through the interchange at Ashford-Dunwoody Road and Interstate 285 in Atlanta's Perimeter area. The busy district is one of several areas where the Georgia Department of Transportation and some School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni at Kimley-Horn and Associates are using advanced technology and traffic signal timing to maximize the flow of traffic. (Photo Courtesy: Kimley-Horn and Associates)

The next time you’re sitting at a red light and cursing traffic, remember: it could be significantly worse. In fact, it would be worse for a number of major commuting corridors in the Atlanta area — if not for the efforts of people like two Georgia Tech civil engineering alumni who are involved in a pacesetting state program to make traffic flow more smoothly.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Donovan elected to College of Engineering Hall of Fame; Carlos, Flower, Bern honored at engineering alumni awards

Fred Donovan Sr. speaks at the Georgia Tech College of Engineering Alumni Awards after being inducted in the Engineering Hall of Fame.

A quartet of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni were among those honored at the Georgia Tech College of Engineering Alumni Awards in April. Fred C. Donovan Sr. was inducted into the Engineering Hall of Fame, while Jimmy Carlos and Paul Flower were selected for the Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni. Jose Bern joined the Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Pappas wins American Chemical Society leadership award

Christopher Pappas is this year’s recipient of the Leadership Award for Outstanding Corporate Reinvention from the American Chemical Society’s Chemical Marketing and Economics group. (Courtesy: Business Wire)

The American Chemical Society New York chapter will recognize alumnus Christopher Pappas later this year for his leadership of chemical firm Trinseo. The group announced April 6 that Pappas, BCE 1978, is this year’s recipient of the Leadership Award for Outstanding Corporate Reinvention from the society’s Chemical Marketing and Economics group.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Shah joins young professional leadership of Chicago Council on Global Affairs

Alumnus Falak Shah has been named to a select group of young leaders who represent the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ next generation, the Young Professionals Ambassadors. (Photo Courtesy: Falak Shah)

Alumnus Falak Shah has been named to a select group of young leaders who represent the Chicago Council on Global Affairs’ next generation.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Dialynas just finished his PhD, now he’s contributing to a national carbon cycle report

Yannis Dialynas defended his Ph.D. thesis in January and hasn’t even celebrated his graduation. Yet he’s been working on the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report’s soils chapter, contributing insight from his doctoral research on the influence of soil erosion and carbon burial on the global carbon cycle.

The soon-to-be-released second State of the Carbon Cycle Report includes work from some of the nation’s leading scientists — including contributions from a civil engineer who just finished his Ph.D. at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

One year later, InVenture team has turned idea into startup

Team TruePani reacts after they're announced as the People's Choice Award winners at the 2016 InVenture Prize finals. The team designed an antimicrobial cup and water storage device that makes drinking water safer. Shannon Evanchec and Samantha Becker have been working full-time for the last year to turn their winning invention into a viable business. (Photo: Fitrah Hamid)

A year ago, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering seniors Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec were convinced they could change lives in rural villages around the globe. They were about to sell InVenture Prize judges on their antimicrobial cup and lotus flower, which uses copper to kill germs in household water in places like India where contamination with E. coli and other microbes is a significant problem. Now Becker and Evanchec have graduated, and they’re working full-time to turn their creation into a business they call TruePani.

Friday, March 10, 2017

Pages

Subscribe to Alumni