Atlanta

Which bicycle infrastructure makes riders safer? Turns out, we don’t yet know

A bicyclist rides in a marked bike lane alongside a multi-lane road in Lutz, Florida. A new study of bicycle infrastructure from a team of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers has found we don’t know much yet about how well bicycle infrastructure like these lanes protect riders. (Photo Courtesy: Daniel Oines via Flickr.)

Shared lane markings. Bike lanes painted a bright color. Bike boxes at intersections. Cycle tracks that provide physical barriers between bikes and cars. Communities have built these and other flavors of infrastructure to try to make it safer for people to ride their bikes along roadways or through neighborhoods. But which ones work best?

Friday, June 9, 2017

These two alumni help make Atlanta’s everyday commute better, saving drivers time and money

Traffic moves through the interchange at Ashford-Dunwoody Road and Interstate 285 in Atlanta's Perimeter area. The busy district is one of several areas where the Georgia Department of Transportation and some School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni at Kimley-Horn and Associates are using advanced technology and traffic signal timing to maximize the flow of traffic. (Photo Courtesy: Kimley-Horn and Associates)

The next time you’re sitting at a red light and cursing traffic, remember: it could be significantly worse. In fact, it would be worse for a number of major commuting corridors in the Atlanta area — if not for the efforts of people like two Georgia Tech civil engineering alumni who are involved in a pacesetting state program to make traffic flow more smoothly.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Hunter tells GPB many more questions remain about self-driving cars

Screenshot of GPB web page featuring the March 16 segment on self-driving cars that included Michael Hunter.

Appearing on the GPB public radio program On Second Thought March 16, transportation research Michael Hunter said the jury remains out on whether autonomous vehicles will make our roads safer. Hunter said such questions are the focus of inquiry as cities and states move closer to allowing the driverless cars on their roadways.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Tien: What we build builds communities

A neighborhood on the Westside of Atlanta, an example of the premise that has been stuck in Iris Tien's mind recently: how the infrastructure civil and environmental engineers build — or the lack thereof in areas like this — influences the surrounding community. (Photo: Iris Tien)

In a blog post for the Georgia Tech Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain, Iris Tien lays out the importance of civil infrastructure in building communities.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Hunter: No ‘magic bullet’ for traffic tangles in Atlanta’s Perimeter area

Screen shot of Perimeter Center traffic solutions story featuring Michael Hunter.

No single solution will be able to untangle one of metro Atlanta’s worst areas for traffic, the Perimeter Center at the top end of Interstate 285. Rather, Associate Professor Michael Hunter suggested to the Sandy Springs Reporter, the area needs a combination of approaches, from public transit and corporate shuttles to multi-use trails and telecommuting.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Cycle Atlanta wins Research of the Year award from Young Professionals in Transportation

A smartphone app and related study for Atlanta bicyclists has won the first-ever Excellence in Innovation / Research of the Year Award from the Young Professionals in Transportation organization. The Cycle Atlanta app, developed by CEE’s Kari Watkins and Christopher Le Dantec from the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, tracks the routes cyclists travel through the city and allows them to note amenities or problems along the way. That helps other riders, and it helps the city develop cycling infrastructure in the right places.

Thursday, June 4, 2015

Creative Loafing: Will synced signals improve Atlanta traffic?

Voters in the City of Atlanta will decide in a few weeks on a $250 million bond referendum that includes, among other things, millions to sync the traffic signals across the city. Creative Loafing’s Max Blau asked the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Michael Hunter how syncing works.

Thursday, February 26, 2015
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