Carbon

Dialynas just finished his PhD, now he’s contributing to a national carbon cycle report

Yannis Dialynas defended his Ph.D. thesis in January and hasn’t even celebrated his graduation. Yet he’s been working on the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report’s soils chapter, contributing insight from his doctoral research on the influence of soil erosion and carbon burial on the global carbon cycle.

The soon-to-be-released second State of the Carbon Cycle Report includes work from some of the nation’s leading scientists — including contributions from a civil engineer who just finished his Ph.D. at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Dialynas wins NASA support for his work on soil erosion and atmospheric carbon dioxide

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas has won an Earth and Space Science Fellowship from NASA to support his studies.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Yellow Jacket loyalty: 5 questions with student-turned-professor Sheng Dai

Assistant Professor Sheng Dai in his lab.

Sheng Dai arrived in Atlanta just a week before classes began for the fall 2015 semester, and it was really a homecoming of sorts. Dai is the newest faculty member in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, arriving after two years at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. But before that, he spent half a decade in the School, earning his doctorate in civil engineering. He finished in 2013.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Dykstra joins other ‘rising stars’ at selective MIT workshop

Fourth-year graduate student Christine Dykstra joined 19 other women from around the country at a small gathering last week for early career engineers planning to enter academia. The Rising Stars Workshop at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is designed to foster scientific conversation between the next generation of civil and environmental engineering faculty members and help them build their careers.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

What’s discoloring the Taj Mahal? Georgia Tech scientists have figured it out

The Taj Mahal’s iconic marble dome and soaring minarets require regular cleaning to maintain their dazzling appearance, and scientists now know why. Researchers from the United States and India are pointing the finger at airborne carbon particles and dust for giving the gleaming white landmark a brownish cast.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014
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