Climate Change

Dialynas just finished his PhD, now he’s contributing to a national carbon cycle report

Yannis Dialynas defended his Ph.D. thesis in January and hasn’t even celebrated his graduation. Yet he’s been working on the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report’s soils chapter, contributing insight from his doctoral research on the influence of soil erosion and carbon burial on the global carbon cycle.

The soon-to-be-released second State of the Carbon Cycle Report includes work from some of the nation’s leading scientists — including contributions from a civil engineer who just finished his Ph.D. at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Liquid Assets: Tech researchers are working to solve the world’s water problems

Water drop

From the drinking-water contamination in Flint, Mich., to the seemingly endless drought in California, good old H2O pools at the heart of many of today’s most pressing and headline-grabbing problems. Find out how the work and ideas of Tech researchers are helping us understand — and solve — these planet-wide challenges.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Saving coastal cities from rising seas: Clough shares his New Orleans experience

Screenshot of Line//Shape//Space story on coastal engineering and sea level rise.

Sea walls aren’t enough to protect the world’s coastal communities from inundation as sea levels rise. In fact, Georgia Tech President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough tells web magazine Line//Shape//Space, no single strategy will.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Global warming, a dead zone and mysterious bacteria

Researchers Liz Robertson from the University of Southern Denmark and Josh Manger from the University of California, San Diego, ready a sample collector off Mexico's Pacific coast. They’re part of a research team that discovered bacteria making oxygen minimum zones in the ocean even deader by sucking up all life-giving nitrogen molecules. (Photo: Heather Olins)

In ocean expanses where oxygen has vanished, newly discovered bacteria are diminishing additional life molecules. They help make virtual dead zones even deader. Now, a team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology has discovered members of a highly prolific bacteria group known as SAR11 living in the world’s largest oxygen minimum zone. The team has produced unambiguous evidence that the bacteria play a major role in denitrification.

Monday, August 8, 2016

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Dialynas wins NASA support for his work on soil erosion and atmospheric carbon dioxide

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas has won an Earth and Space Science Fellowship from NASA to support his studies.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

Shellby Miller’s trip to Kiritimati Island illustrates stark realities of climate change

Coral reef off Kiritimati Island. (Photo: Pamela Grothe)

Senior Shellby Miller traveled to Kiritimati Island in March to collect coral samples for her undergraduate research project investigating whether scientists can use some coral species chemical signals to track sea-surface temperatures. This is part of an ongoing series of essays from across the globe written by CEE students who have traveled abroad with the support of the Joe S. Mundy Global Learning Endowment.

Monday, May 9, 2016

Yellow Jacket loyalty: 5 questions with student-turned-professor Sheng Dai

Assistant Professor Sheng Dai in his lab.

Sheng Dai arrived in Atlanta just a week before classes began for the fall 2015 semester, and it was really a homecoming of sorts. Dai is the newest faculty member in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, arriving after two years at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. But before that, he spent half a decade in the School, earning his doctorate in civil engineering. He finished in 2013.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

The engineer’s voice in the ‘age of humans’

Georgia Tech President Emeritus Wayne Clough says engineers must be part of the broader conversation about the challenges facing our global society in the 21st century. In a new video for the academic journal Elementa, Clough says engineers need to develop their public-facing voice on the big issues that do (and will) confront our communities.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Clough tackles climate change in first Hyatt Distinguished lecture

Georgia Tech President Emeritus Wayne Clough said engineers have a responsibility to plan for climate change in the first-ever Hyatt Distinguished Alumni Leadership Lecture March 24. The civil engineering alumnus said engineers must be part of the climate change conversation.

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

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