Leadership Minor

Water, water everywhere: In the world of water research, underserved communities provide the ultimate learning ground for undergrads

Water, water everywhere: In the world of water research, underserved communities provide the ultimate learning ground for undergrads.

As if singlehandedly leading a dozen undergraduates at a time in the realm of real-world research isn’t enough of a challenge, Joe Brown ups the ante, carrying his undergrads to conduct fieldwork overseas — in a foreign-language country.

Monday, May 1, 2017

Changed: Students just back from Bolivia research trip talk about how it shifted their thinking in latest podcast

Students learn about a rainwater collector in the El Campo community from a local engineering during their Spring Break research trip to Bolivia. The trip, part of the Environmental Technology in the Developing World class, included days of collecting water samples and surveying residents as well as days learning how rural communities have developed their own water systems. (Photo: Donald Smith)

A dozen School of Civil and Environmental Engineering students will travel to New York this weekend to present their findings from a recent research trip to Bolivia. We’re not talking graduate students who’ve been doing research for months or years. No, this is a group of undergrads who spent just over a week abroad as part of a course they’ve been taking with Joe Brown called Environmental Technology in the Developing World.

Thursday, April 20, 2017

StoryCorps: Bivins and Yoo learn from each other and build a friendship on class trips to Bolivia

Aaron Bivins and Rebecca Yoo (Photo: StoryCorps Atlanta)

Rebecca Yoo and Aaron Bivins have been to Bolivia twice together for a class in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The pair sat down in the StoryCorps Atlanta booth recently to talk about doing research abroad and how the class, Environmental Technology in the Developing World, has shaped their perspective.

Friday, December 2, 2016

Eichbauer learns simple sometimes works best during summer water project in Nicaragua

The city of Bluefields, Nicaragua, and Bluefields Bay. Environmental engineering undergraduate Kelsey Eichbauer spent eight weeks this summer working in this community with the nonprofit blueEnergy. She helped design and build simple water-filtration systems to reuse so-called "greywater" — all the semi-clean wastewater that comes from everywhere except the toilet. (Photo: Kelsey Eichbauer)

Kelsey Eichbauer spent most of her summer helping design and build systems to treat and recycle greywater for the community in Bluefields, Nicaragua. This is the wastewater from baths, sinks, kitchen appliances, laundry — essentially anywhere but the toilet. The work was part of the Global Leadership Program with blueEnergy, a nonprofit dedicated to providing energy, clean water, and sanitation in coastal Caribbean areas.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Two weeks in China and Japan teaches students about disaster engineering, Asian culture — and themselves

The International Disaster Reconnaissance Studies class on the Great Wall of China, one of their first stops during their two-week trip to China and Japan.

They climbed the Great Wall of China and explored the Forbidden City. They visited a town destroyed by an earthquake then preserved as a monument to the lives lost. They saw baby pandas and flood control systems, Japanese towns devastated by a tsunami and the Hiroshima memorial. But in the end, it was the relationships they built and an overnight summit of Mt. Fuji in Japan that etched this trip into the memories of four engineering students who traveled to China and Japan in early August.

Friday, August 26, 2016

New year brings new faces to CEE classrooms

Rudy Bonparte and John Taylor, two of the new faces in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering this fall.

Several new faces are joining the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty this fall, bringing hard-earned experience from the real-world and new areas of research prowess to the School.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Lindsey’s thoughts on engineers and ethics win her ASCE’s Daniel Mead Prize

Senior Maggie Lindsey in Costa Rica with one of the young students who will attend a primary school she helped design and build.

Maggie Lindsey has won second place in the American Society of Civil Engineers Daniel Mead Prize competition for her essay on professional ethics in foreign countries.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Class bikes through the Netherlands to study sustainable transportation

The Sustainable Transportation Abroad class outside the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam.

A group of Georgia Tech students has just returned from two weeks studying bicycle infrastructure in the Netherlands and contrasting the Dutch approach to American standards. The overwhelming consensus: it’s not just bicycles that define the Dutch transportation system. Rather, it's the integration of biking with all forms of public transit and infrastructure planning that makes the Netherlands’ famed bike culture a way of life.

Friday, June 3, 2016

#GTBolivia: Spring Break research trip aims to make water safer in Bolivia

Students collecting water samples along Bolivia's Choqueyapu River.

While many Georgia Tech students enjoyed some time away from classes during Spring Break, students in Joe Brown's "Environmental Technology in the Developing World" class were working to improve the lives of Bolivians. Join us on their journey, through the students' own words and pictures.

Friday, April 1, 2016

New minor teaches engineers how to be global leaders and problem solvers

The designers of a new global engineering leadership development minor are rolling out new courses for the summer and fall and accepting applications from interested students. They’ve also scheduled lunchtime information sessions February 24 and 27 for interested students.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015
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