Sanitation

Danger in the air? Brown wins NSF CAREER grant to find out

Assistant Professor Joe Brown has won an Early Career Development Award from the National Science Foundation. These so-called CAREER grants recognize promising young faculty with funds to help them establish the research director of their careers. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

When Joe Brown went to India last summer, he was hoping to collect samples that could help answer some questions he’d been thinking about for a while. His years studying sanitation and global health had given him the idea that the open sewers and overflowing latrines common in the dense cities of the developing world could be linked with disease through an unusual mechanism: airborne transmission of pathogens.

Friday, February 24, 2017

InVenture Prize finalists include two CEE undergrads

Diagram of the TruePani drinking cup invented by a team that includes CEE undergrads Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec.

Undergraduates Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec have helped build a better cup — one that’s designed to reduce the risk of diarrheal diseases in rural communities. Now they’ll compete with five other teams for the InVenture Prize next month.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Does better sanitation mean healthier children? A first-of-its-kind test case in Mozambique will tell us

Does providing some sort of improved latrine for children in developing countries actually improve their health? The obvious answer would seem to be “yes.” But the truth is, we don’t have the hard science to prove it.

Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Will the new set of global development goals make sanitation a priority? World expert and alumnus Eddy Perez makes his case

For the global community to make universal access to sanitation services a reality in the next 15 years, Eddy Perez says we’ll have to flip our traditional approach.

Friday, February 27, 2015

For Aaron Bivins, Maputo trip turns sanitation data into harsh reality

Master’s student Aaron Bivins spent part of his summer traveling to Mozambique to help lay the groundwork for a study about the relationship between population density and the health effects of sanitation. This is part of an ongoing series of essays from across the globe written by CEE students who have traveled abroad with the support of the Joe S. Mundy Global Learning Endowment.

Tuesday, December 30, 2014
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