Shannon Evanchec

One year later, InVenture team has turned idea into startup

Team TruePani reacts after they're announced as the People's Choice Award winners at the 2016 InVenture Prize finals. The team designed an antimicrobial cup and water storage device that makes drinking water safer. Shannon Evanchec and Samantha Becker have been working full-time for the last year to turn their winning invention into a viable business. (Photo: Fitrah Hamid)

A year ago, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering seniors Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec were convinced they could change lives in rural villages around the globe. They were about to sell InVenture Prize judges on their antimicrobial cup and lotus flower, which uses copper to kill germs in household water in places like India where contamination with E. coli and other microbes is a significant problem. Now Becker and Evanchec have graduated, and they’re working full-time to turn their creation into a business they call TruePani.

Friday, March 10, 2017

New podcast debuts with insider help for future civil and environmental engineering students

Headphones and a sound board before a recording for the first edition of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering's new "Field Notes" podcast. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering has released the first episode of a new podcast that will feature conversations with students, faculty and alumni to explore ideas and help people connect with the School. The aim of the first edition is to help high school students better understand the School and careers in civil or environmental engineering.

Thursday, February 9, 2017

InVenture team creates a simple system to keep household water clean in developing countries

Samantha Becker, left, and Shannon Evanchec film a segment about their water purification system ahead of the live-televised finals of the InVenture Prize. Their team, TruePani, will compete with five other finalists for $20,000, a free patent filing, and a place in a Georgia Tech startup incubator at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. (Photo: TruePani)

For something like 900 million people in India, access to clean water isn’t the problem. It’s keeping that water clean once it reaches households. A team of civil and environmental engineering and business administration students have invented a system to fight bacterial growth. They compete for the InVenture Prize March 16.

Monday, March 14, 2016

The class project that could spark Charleston’s future

A concept of what the Charleston Lowcountry Lowline could look like once it's built. (Image: Friends of the Lowcountry Lowline)

The Charleston Lowcountry Lowline project aims to turn an abandoned railroad line in the heart of the Charleston peninsula into a 6.5-mile linear park — and a group of Georgia Tech students are helping take the first steps to making the dream a reality.

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

InVenture Prize finalists include two CEE undergrads

Diagram of the TruePani drinking cup invented by a team that includes CEE undergrads Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec.

Undergraduates Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec have helped build a better cup — one that’s designed to reduce the risk of diarrheal diseases in rural communities. Now they’ll compete with five other teams for the InVenture Prize next month.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Summer travel to India leads to culture shock — just not the one Shannon Evanchec expected

"As I sat down to reflect on my experience this summer, I came to the realization that it is incredibly difficult to put something so life changing into words." Read more from Shannon Evanchec about her research trip to India last summer, which was funded by the Joe S. Mundy Global Learning Endowment.

Tuesday, September 29, 2015
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