Traffic Signals

These two alumni help make Atlanta’s everyday commute better, saving drivers time and money

Traffic moves through the interchange at Ashford-Dunwoody Road and Interstate 285 in Atlanta's Perimeter area. The busy district is one of several areas where the Georgia Department of Transportation and some School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni at Kimley-Horn and Associates are using advanced technology and traffic signal timing to maximize the flow of traffic. (Photo Courtesy: Kimley-Horn and Associates)

The next time you’re sitting at a red light and cursing traffic, remember: it could be significantly worse. In fact, it would be worse for a number of major commuting corridors in the Atlanta area — if not for the efforts of people like two Georgia Tech civil engineering alumni who are involved in a pacesetting state program to make traffic flow more smoothly.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Creative Loafing: Will synced signals improve Atlanta traffic?

Voters in the City of Atlanta will decide in a few weeks on a $250 million bond referendum that includes, among other things, millions to sync the traffic signals across the city. Creative Loafing’s Max Blau asked the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Michael Hunter how syncing works.

Thursday, February 26, 2015
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