Blissit named a Young Professional of the Year for her service, professional work

Friday, March 11, 2016

Master's student Annie Blissit, one of the American Council of Engineering Companies' 2016 Young Professionals of the Year.

Master’s student Annie Blissit is one of the American Council of Engineering Companies’ 2016 Young Professionals of the Year.

Blissit, who studies part-time in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, also works as an engineer-in-training at Gresham, Smith and Partners on water and wastewater treatment projects.

Annie Blissit takes samples at a water treatment plant. She's an engineer-in-training at Gresham, Smith and Partners as well as a master's student in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Annie Blissit)
Annie Blissit takes samples at a water treatment plant. She's an engineer-in-training at Gresham, Smith and Partners as well as a master's student in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Annie Blissit)

“This award recognizes the accomplishments of young engineers and their resulting impact on society. It was quite an honor to find out I had been nominated and selected for the award,” Blissit said. “I have always enjoyed being involved in organizations and service and am excited for the opportunity to share the importance of this work and how we can support those in our industry looking to get involved and give back.”

Blissit has long been involved in volunteer service. The council said the award honors that dedication to giving back as well as Blissit’s professional work in water resources.

“I grew up volunteering at a men’s night shelter and was involved with Habitat for Humanity in high school. In college, I was part of the national service fraternity, Alpha Phi Omega,” Blissit told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution recently. “I try to continue that service through our volunteer initiatives at work and through the American Society of Civil Engineers. I like working with schools, Habitat, and doing river cleanups.”

Blissit takes her service work abroad this summer, when she’ll help lead a group of young engineers to Nicaragua building a foot bridge to connect a remote village to the nearby school, church and other community buildings.

The Georgia native said she’s using her graduate studies in environmental engineering to broaden her knowledge, and she’s already seeing that pay off day-to-day.

“I always had an interest in going to graduate school but was eager to enter the workforce after graduating,” she said. “About a year into working in water/wastewater treatment, I realized I needed to supplement my degree in civil engineering with more advanced chemical and biological treatment studies. I enrolled at Georgia Tech and have been taking classes part-time while still working in consulting. I have thoroughly enjoyed my classes and love seeing all the connections to my daily work.”