Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

2017 Nevada Medal goes to newly minted PhD Sujith Mangalathu

Newly minted Ph.D. Sujith Mangalathu received more good news in the days after he officially graduated from Georgia Tech: he also has won the 2017 Nevada Medal for his research on bridge engineering.

Ph.D. student — and now graduate — Sujith Mangalathu has won the 2017 Nevada Medal for his work on bridge engineering.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Balancing military service, marriage, grad school: Two Army majors pick Tech to advance their careers

Marc and Kate Sanborn are working on doctorates in civil engineering with Lauren Stewart. The couple, married since 2012, are majors in the U.S. Army and need advanced degrees to continue their careers teaching at the U.S. Military Academy. (Photo: Missy Jurick)

Marc and Kate Sanborn are no strangers to building things. They built a marriage together. They built their Army careers to Majors together. And now they’re building upon their graduate degrees at Georgia Tech.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Change agent: Many resist change, but John Taylor has made a career studying it

John E. Taylor, the new Frederick L. Olmsted Profession in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

John E. Taylor joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the summer of 2016 as the inaugural Frederick L. Olmsted Professor. Taylor studies the dynamics where human and engineered networks meet, making him an ideal fit for an endowed professorship named for the father of landscape architecture and a designer who believed engineered infrastructure should be both functional and aesthetically appealing, serving society’s needs while also creating more livable and healthy communities.

Monday, December 12, 2016

New corrosion-resistant concrete reinforcement wins AASHTO Sweet 16 award for extending life of coastal bridges

A group of Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers after they received an AASHTO Sweet Sixteen award from DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry Dec. 8. Their work on corrosion-resistant concrete piles for marine environments has been used on bridges in Georgia and is being tested for use in nearby states.

A leading standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. The work developed a new steel to reinforce concrete bridge piles in marine environments that withstands corrosion and lasts well beyond the expected 100-year lifespan of the structures.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen meets with her TI:GER program group in October 2016 to talk about their project. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, is working on an idea with Assistant Professor Iris Tien they think will make a difference in improving America's crumbling infrastructure. It's work with so much potential that Johansen is working with other Georgia Tech and Emory University graduate students to commercialize her research.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Hurricanes vs. Stadiums: Stewart explains why the massive structures can withstand storms

SEC Country website screen shot of a story looking at the effects of major hurricanes on college football stadiums.

With Hurricane Matthew looming, college football programs throughout the Southeast had to consider the impact of the massive storm on their scheduled games Oct. 8. Two games has to be postponed — one indefinitely — prompting the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s SEC Country website to ask what would happen to a stadium in a major hurricane.

Monday, October 10, 2016

Tien: What we build builds communities

A neighborhood on the Westside of Atlanta, an example of the premise that has been stuck in Iris Tien's mind recently: how the infrastructure civil and environmental engineers build — or the lack thereof in areas like this — influences the surrounding community. (Photo: Iris Tien)

In a blog post for the Georgia Tech Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain, Iris Tien lays out the importance of civil infrastructure in building communities.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

A Booming Career

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in her lab.

Walking toward Lauren Stewart’s office, you immediately smell the odor of glue in the air. A quick glance around reveals model bridges in various states of completion lying about a student work area as harried undergraduates work to finish class assignments. Stewart, an assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, teaches a beginning structures course, so this is a recurrent theme each semester. Stewart herself, however, is more at home with the smell of explosives and destruction rather than construction.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Air Force selects Stewart for summer faculty fellowship program

Lauren Stewart in her lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Lauren Stewart will spend some of her summer at Eglin Air Force Base in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida, working to better understand how military components react when they strike a “hardened target.” Stewart has received a summer faculty fellowship from the Air Force Research Lab.

Friday, March 25, 2016

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