Air Pollution

Protecting Rural Schoolchildren from Prescribed Fire Emissions

modest flames burn along the ground beneath a field of pine trees as a firefighter walks through the background

A $1 million award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will help researchers in Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering develop tactics to protect children from harmful emissions from controlled wildland burns. The initiative will provide equipment and new communications approaches in middle and high schools in Albany and Columbus, Ga., and Phenix City, Ala. Georgia Tech is focusing on the three cities because of their proximity to regular controlled burns, in addition to the communities’ lower socioeconomic statuses.

Thursday, September 23, 2021

The next frontier in air quality: Kaiser studies the precursors to pollution to improve our cities’ air

Graphic of cars, trucks and buses with clouds of smoke and a hazy city skyline. Text: The Next Frontier in Air Quality - Finding new ways to understand air pollution. (Graphic: Sarah Collins)

Atlanta’s pollutants create a perfect research setting for Jennifer Kaiser, an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech. Kaiser leads research focused on the emissions and chemistry of air pollutants, working to understand how nature and humans contribute to air pollution. Understanding those processes, she said, will help local, regional and global leaders make better policy.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Waste reuse strategies could take a big bite out of greenhouse gas emissions in China’s cities

Air pollution hangs over a portion of Beijing, China. A new study by researchers from Georgia Tech, the University of Minnesota, Yale University and partners in China finds that cities could cut greenhouse gas emissions by a third, significantly improving air quality and health, by adopting a series of strategies to reuse industrial waste. (Photo Courtesy: Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota)

Cities in China could cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than a third if they were to adopt a series of strategies that reuse industrial byproducts for things like heating or construction material.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Journal names Ivey’s paper on sourcing and counting pollution from atmospheric reactions the best of 2016

A paper that grew from Cesunica Ivey's doctoral research in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering has been named one of the two best papers in Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering for 2016. The article outlines a new way to estimate the amount and source of secondary PM2.5 pollution in the air.

Cesunica Ivey’s paper outlining a new way to estimate the amount and source of air pollution has been named one of the two best articles published in 2016 in the journal Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Sustainability, emissions, travel behavior among challenges researchers will tackle in 6 new University Transportation Centers

U.S. Department of Transportation map showing all of the newly funded University Transportation Centers and the affiliated universities.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced Dec. 5 it would invest $300 million in new research through University Transportation Centers, including half a dozen where the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will play a significant role.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Burning trash in India major cause of Taj Mahal discoloration, leads to hundreds of premature deaths

The Taj Mahal (Photo: Michael Bergin)

Researchers from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have found burning trash around the Taj Mahal is not only a major factor in the monument’s discoloration, it’s contributing to hundreds of premature deaths each year. The new study, published Oct. 7 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, builds on previous work that led local communities to ban burning of cow dung cakes, a common cooking fuel.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Odman’s new project will help us understand how prescribed burns impact health, air quality across the Southeast

Prescribed burn near Griffin, Georgia

When land managers in Florida or South Carolina or Georgia approve outdoor burns in their states, the resulting smoke doesn’t float to the state line and stop. Yet there’s no unified way to track all of this burning across the Southeast and account for the resulting impacts on air quality and residents’ health. Researcher Talat Odman has just secured funding to help address the problem

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Less sulfate in the air, but it’s still as acidic as ever

Hongyu Guo, Rodney Weber and Ted Russell on their research platform atop the Ford Environmental Science & Technology Building.

Acidic sulfur emissions from power plants have been rapidly declining over the past decade, and the neutralizing base – ammonia – is emitted from a different source, and has not declined. This has led many atmospheric scientists to assume that the ambient sulfate particles we all breathe are becoming less acidic and therefore less toxic. But a new study shows this intuitive expectation hasn’t happened, at least not in the Southeast United States, where the remaining sulfate particles appear to be as acidic as ever.

Monday, February 22, 2016

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