Air Quality

The next frontier in air quality: Kaiser studies the precursors to pollution to improve our cities’ air

Graphic of cars, trucks and buses with clouds of smoke and a hazy city skyline. Text: The Next Frontier in Air Quality - Finding new ways to understand air pollution. (Graphic: Sarah Collins)

Atlanta’s pollutants create a perfect research setting for Jennifer Kaiser, an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech. Kaiser leads research focused on the emissions and chemistry of air pollutants, working to understand how nature and humans contribute to air pollution. Understanding those processes, she said, will help local, regional and global leaders make better policy.

Monday, April 22, 2019

USG names Rodgers a Regents Researcher

Michael Rodgers, principal research scientist in the school and now a Regents Researcher. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Michael Rodgers received the University System of Georgia’s highest research recognition August 14 when the Board of Regents named him a Regents Researcher.

Monday, August 20, 2018

Waste reuse strategies could take a big bite out of greenhouse gas emissions in China’s cities

Air pollution hangs over a portion of Beijing, China. A new study by researchers from Georgia Tech, the University of Minnesota, Yale University and partners in China finds that cities could cut greenhouse gas emissions by a third, significantly improving air quality and health, by adopting a series of strategies to reuse industrial waste. (Photo Courtesy: Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota)

Cities in China could cut greenhouse gas emissions by more than a third if they were to adopt a series of strategies that reuse industrial byproducts for things like heating or construction material.

Thursday, September 28, 2017

Journal names Ivey’s paper on sourcing and counting pollution from atmospheric reactions the best of 2016

A paper that grew from Cesunica Ivey's doctoral research in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering has been named one of the two best papers in Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering for 2016. The article outlines a new way to estimate the amount and source of secondary PM2.5 pollution in the air.

Cesunica Ivey’s paper outlining a new way to estimate the amount and source of air pollution has been named one of the two best articles published in 2016 in the journal Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

Odman’s new project will help us understand how prescribed burns impact health, air quality across the Southeast

Prescribed burn near Griffin, Georgia

When land managers in Florida or South Carolina or Georgia approve outdoor burns in their states, the resulting smoke doesn’t float to the state line and stop. Yet there’s no unified way to track all of this burning across the Southeast and account for the resulting impacts on air quality and residents’ health. Researcher Talat Odman has just secured funding to help address the problem

Tuesday, June 7, 2016

New approach could reduce human health impacts of electric power generation

By combining information about power plant operation with real-time air quality predictions, researchers have created a new capability to minimize the human health effects of air pollution resulting from electric power generating facilities. The Air Pollutant Optimization Model, described in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides a new approach for reducing the health effects of ozone and fine particulate pollution.

Monday, August 17, 2015

In their own words: A research trip to Bolivia changes travelers’ perspectives

A dozen School of Civil and Environmental Engineering students spent their Spring Break working in La Paz, Bolivia, and nearby rural communities. Traipsing around with strange apparatuses hanging around their necks or dipping graduated cylinders into lakes and under water spigots. Connecting their years of classroom study to the real world.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Spending Spring Break among the alpacas

While many students left campus last Friday for a well-deserved break from classes, one group boarded a plane for South America, where they’ll spend the week applying their research in remote communities in Bolivia.

Monday, March 16, 2015
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