Alumni

Kelley finds his passion in creating places that build community

John Kelley, BSCE 1992, at the Avalon development in Alpharetta, Georgia

John Kelley finished his civil engineering degree in 1992 and went right to work helping real estate developers with the engineering piece of their plans. It wasn’t long, however, before Kelley realized he wanted to be more deeply involved in these projects, to “touch all the pieces,” as he says.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

Braves’ New World

Rendering of SunTrust Park, scheduled to open in spring 2017. (Image: Atlanta Braves)

This summer is a history-making one for baseball in Atlanta. It’s the last of the hometown Braves’ two-decade run in Turner Field. By next season, the team will have moved a few miles north to Cobb County. Some School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni have had a direct hand in this new legacy under construction.

Friday, June 10, 2016

Reddy and his sewing robots are IndustryWeek’s Manufacturing Leader of the Week

IndustryWeek website screen shot

Serial entrepreneur and sewing-automation leader K.P. Reddy is IndustryWeek magazine’s Manufacturing Leader of the Week for June 6-12. Reddy, who earned his Georgia Tech civil engineering degree in 1994, is CEO of SoftWear Automation, a startup that is reinventing the sewing automation process using robots and machine vision.

Friday, June 10, 2016

As hurricane season begins, how a Georgia Tech civil engineer created the five categories we use to classify storms

Hurricane Isabel, the strongest storm of the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season. (Photo: NASA)

After three relatively quiet years, forecasters predict we’ll see something close to a “normal” year in terms of hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean this year — 10 to 16 named storms with up to four of those considered major hurricanes. “Major” means a Category 3, 4 or 5 storm, a vernacular we wouldn’t have without School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumnus Herbert Saffir.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

64 years later, Philip Sarris gets the diploma he earned

Professor Aris Georgakakos with Philip Sarris, BSCE 1952.

When Philip Sarris finished his civil engineering degree at Georgia Tech, he already had a job waiting. Actually, in many ways, he had two jobs waiting. One was with Southern Railway, where Sarris had worked as a co-op student throughout his time at Tech. The other was with the United States Army, which drafted him and sent him off to Korea. All of that meant Sarris didn’t cross the stage and officially collect his diploma in 1952.

Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Remembering alumnus, former faculty member James Wallace (1938-2016)

Alumnus and former faculty member James R. Wallace (1938-2016)

Former students and colleagues are celebrating James R. Wallace’s life this week after news reached the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering community that he died May 11. He was 77 years old.

Friday, May 20, 2016

How to turn a civil engineering degree into a job with one of the country’s ‘big 3’ consulting firms

Daniella Remolina, who graduated in December and started work this month with the Boston Consulting Group.

This month, Daniella Remolina started work at one of the world’s largest consulting firms, the Boston Consulting Group. It’s an unexpected, but certainly welcome, turn of events for Remolina, who finished an internship with the company and her bachelor’s degree in civil engineering in December.

Thursday, April 21, 2016

Tellepsen joins College of Engineering Hall of Fame; Higginbotham and Mitchell win alumni awards

Howard Tellepsen speaks at the College of Engineering Alumni Awards April 16. Tellepsen, BSCE 1966, was inducted into the College's Hall of Fame.

The Georgia Tech College of Engineering honored three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni April 16. The recognition came at the College’s annual alumni awards.

Monday, April 18, 2016

As luck would have it: Wick Moorman found serendipity in a life of railroading

Charles "Wick" Moorman (Photo: Gary Meek)

Luck seems antithetical to engineering. There are no equations, statistics or models for luck — there is no control. But to Wick Moorman, BSCE 1975, the recently retired chairman and CEO of railroad company Norfolk Southern, luck matters. It has, he insists, been a central force of his career.

Monday, April 18, 2016

Hyatt Lecture: From co-op to CEO, Wick Moorman shares lessons from a life in railroading

Charles "Wick" Moorman after delivering the Hyatt Distinguished Alumni Lecture. (Photo: Zonglin "Jack" Li)

Charles “Wick” Moorman talked about railroads, his experiences at Georgia Tech, and some of the things he learned as he rose to leadership of one of the nation’s five large railroad companies during the Hyatt Distinguished Alumni Leadership Lecture March 9.

Wednesday, March 9, 2016

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