American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials

National group honors research using lasers and AI to automatically assess health of highway pavement and catalog road signs

Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers have earned an award for their work to automatically detect cracks, ruts and other pavement issues on the state's highways. Their system uses lasers and artificial intelligence to also detect and catalog roadside signs. This image shows an automatically detected pavement rut modeled in 3-D. (Image: James Tsai)

A leading, standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. And the work could save time and money for DOTs around the country.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

New corrosion-resistant concrete reinforcement wins AASHTO Sweet 16 award for extending life of coastal bridges

A group of Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers after they received an AASHTO Sweet Sixteen award from DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry Dec. 8. Their work on corrosion-resistant concrete piles for marine environments has been used on bridges in Georgia and is being tested for use in nearby states.

A leading standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. The work developed a new steel to reinforce concrete bridge piles in marine environments that withstands corrosion and lasts well beyond the expected 100-year lifespan of the structures.

Friday, December 9, 2016
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