Big Data

NSF funds two new projects to understand greenhouse gas emissions from soil, expand microbial big-data analysis tools

Microbes in soil can break down nitrous oxide, N2O, into harmless nitrogen, N2, but they don't always do a good job, according to Professor Kostas Konstantinidis. He has a new grant from the National Science Foundation to understand why. The problem is that the nitrous oxide is a powerful and damaging greenhouse gas. The study will focus on agricultural land, where nitrogen is often added to soil as fertilizer, and tropical forests. (Image Courtesy: Kostas Konstantinidis)

Kostas Konstantinidis has received two new grants from the National Science Foundation that promise to help researchers better understand some of the tiniest organisms on the planet.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Suryanarayana leads new $3M project to unlock the power of tomorrow’s supercomputers for understanding chemical phenomena

An illustration depicting chemical catalysis on surfaces and nanostructures. A new $2.8 million study led by School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Associate Professor Phanish Suryanarayana will harness the power of future supercomputers to understand the interactions that take place in these kinds of chemical reactions. (Image Courtesy: Andrew Medford)

Early in the next decade, the first computers capable of at least one quintillion calculations per second will come online at Argonne National Laboratory. Phanish Suryanarayana in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering is leading a team on a new project to make use of all those processors to study the interactions of atoms using quantum mechanics, building on computer code his team has developed in recent years. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the four-year, $2.8 million study — if everything goes well, as Suryanarayana puts it — will mean scientists can study and understand chemical systems that include up to 10 million atoms.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

National Academy invites Konstantinidis to join young leaders at Arab-American Frontiers symposium

Professor Kostas Konstantinidis, who will attend the 2018 Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering and Medicine at the invitation of the National Academy of Science. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Kostas Konstantinidis will join a select group of outstanding engineers, scientists and medical professionals in Kuwait this fall at the invitation of the National Academy of Science and the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Driverless cars? They’re coming, but big data is already shaping traffic

Transportation researcher Michael Hunter says driverless cars are coming to our roads, whether we’re ready for them or not. But already, our cars are generating some of the mountains of data coming from our transportation systems. In an interview with Georgia Public Broadcasting, Hunter said drivers must be ready for cars beside them to operate without people behind the wheel.

Friday, October 23, 2015
Subscribe to Big Data