Clean Water

InVenture team creates a simple system to keep household water clean in developing countries

Samantha Becker, left, and Shannon Evanchec film a segment about their water purification system ahead of the live-televised finals of the InVenture Prize. Their team, TruePani, will compete with five other finalists for $20,000, a free patent filing, and a place in a Georgia Tech startup incubator at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. (Photo: TruePani)

For something like 900 million people in India, access to clean water isn’t the problem. It’s keeping that water clean once it reaches households. A team of civil and environmental engineering and business administration students have invented a system to fight bacterial growth. They compete for the InVenture Prize March 16.

Monday, March 14, 2016

‘30 Second Thesis’ series shows how grad students are changing the world

Aaron Bivins explains his Ph.D. research as part of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering's new video series, "30 Second Thesis."

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering debuts a new video concept March 3 highlighting the work of our graduate students. This occasional series challenges students from every discipline within civil and environmental engineering to explain their research and why it matters in 30 seconds (or close to that).

Thursday, March 3, 2016

InVenture Prize finalists include two CEE undergrads

Diagram of the TruePani drinking cup invented by a team that includes CEE undergrads Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec.

Undergraduates Samantha Becker and Shannon Evanchec have helped build a better cup — one that’s designed to reduce the risk of diarrheal diseases in rural communities. Now they’ll compete with five other teams for the InVenture Prize next month.

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

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