Climate Change

Johnston, Zhang produce two of Georgia Tech’s best Ph.D. dissertations this year

Former Ph.D. students Shelly Zhang and Eric Johnston, who have won the Sigma Xi Best Ph.D. Thesis award for 2019.

Sigma Xi has recognized the work of two recently graduated civil and environmental engineering doctoral students as some of the best of the year at Georgia Tech.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Your carbon footprint is probably higher than you thought, thanks to methane leaking from natural gas systems

Natual gas storage tanks with excess methane burning off. (Photo Courtesy: Jeffrey Phillips via Flickr)

If you're someone who looks at the carbon footprint of the things you buy, you could be significantly underestimating your impact on the environment.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Freshman Alex Ip selected for Al Gore’s Climate Reality Leadership Corps

First-year student Alex Ip.

Alex Ip is just getting started on his Georgia Tech environmental engineering degree, but he’s already connecting with scientists and researchers around the world.

Wednesday, February 27, 2019

Clough, Crittenden co-author National Academy report on grand challenges in environmental engineering

Cover design for the new National Academy of Engineering report, "Environmental Engineering for the 21st Century: Address Grand Challenges." It features the Earth in the center with photos around the circumference of a child drinking water from a spigot, a piece of glacier breaking off, a bulldozer atop piles of trash, a city skyline, and professional-looking people gathered around a laptop.

Professor John Crittenden and President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough have helped chart the course for the future of environmental engineering in a new report from the National Academy of Engineering. Environmental Engineering for the 21st Century: Address Grand Challenges lays out five grand challenges facing society that environmental engineers are uniquely positioned to address — but answering these challenges will require an evolution in environmental engineering education, research and practice, according to the report.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Dialynas just finished his PhD, now he’s contributing to a national carbon cycle report

Yannis Dialynas defended his Ph.D. thesis in January and hasn’t even celebrated his graduation. Yet he’s been working on the second State of the Carbon Cycle Report’s soils chapter, contributing insight from his doctoral research on the influence of soil erosion and carbon burial on the global carbon cycle.

The soon-to-be-released second State of the Carbon Cycle Report includes work from some of the nation’s leading scientists — including contributions from a civil engineer who just finished his Ph.D. at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Liquid Assets: Tech researchers are working to solve the world’s water problems

Water drop

From the drinking-water contamination in Flint, Mich., to the seemingly endless drought in California, good old H2O pools at the heart of many of today’s most pressing and headline-grabbing problems. Find out how the work and ideas of Tech researchers are helping us understand — and solve — these planet-wide challenges.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Saving coastal cities from rising seas: Clough shares his New Orleans experience

Screenshot of Line//Shape//Space story on coastal engineering and sea level rise.

Sea walls aren’t enough to protect the world’s coastal communities from inundation as sea levels rise. In fact, Georgia Tech President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough tells web magazine Line//Shape//Space, no single strategy will.

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Global warming, a dead zone and mysterious bacteria

Researchers Liz Robertson from the University of Southern Denmark and Josh Manger from the University of California, San Diego, ready a sample collector off Mexico's Pacific coast. They’re part of a research team that discovered bacteria making oxygen minimum zones in the ocean even deader by sucking up all life-giving nitrogen molecules. (Photo: Heather Olins)

In ocean expanses where oxygen has vanished, newly discovered bacteria are diminishing additional life molecules. They help make virtual dead zones even deader. Now, a team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology has discovered members of a highly prolific bacteria group known as SAR11 living in the world’s largest oxygen minimum zone. The team has produced unambiguous evidence that the bacteria play a major role in denitrification.

Monday, August 8, 2016

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Dialynas wins NASA support for his work on soil erosion and atmospheric carbon dioxide

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas

Ph.D. student Yannis Dialynas has won an Earth and Space Science Fellowship from NASA to support his studies.

Thursday, May 26, 2016

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