Cycling

Which bicycle infrastructure makes riders safer? Turns out, we don’t yet know

A bicyclist rides in a marked bike lane alongside a multi-lane road in Lutz, Florida. A new study of bicycle infrastructure from a team of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers has found we don’t know much yet about how well bicycle infrastructure like these lanes protect riders. (Photo Courtesy: Daniel Oines via Flickr.)

Shared lane markings. Bike lanes painted a bright color. Bike boxes at intersections. Cycle tracks that provide physical barriers between bikes and cars. Communities have built these and other flavors of infrastructure to try to make it safer for people to ride their bikes along roadways or through neighborhoods. But which ones work best?

Friday, June 9, 2017

Federal Highway Administration awards Eisenhower Fellowships to 6 grad students

2016 Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship recipients Jack Cebe, Calvin Clark, April Gadsby, Alice Grossman, Janille Smith-Colin and Elliot Sperling

Six Georgia Tech graduate students working to improve the nation’s transportation systems have earned the endorsement of the Federal Highway Administration for their work. They’ve been named to the 2016 class of Dwight D. Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships.

Tuesday, July 19, 2016

Cycle Atlanta wins Research of the Year award from Young Professionals in Transportation

A smartphone app and related study for Atlanta bicyclists has won the first-ever Excellence in Innovation / Research of the Year Award from the Young Professionals in Transportation organization. The Cycle Atlanta app, developed by CEE’s Kari Watkins and Christopher Le Dantec from the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, tracks the routes cyclists travel through the city and allows them to note amenities or problems along the way. That helps other riders, and it helps the city develop cycling infrastructure in the right places.

Thursday, June 4, 2015
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