Disasters

Documenting disaster: Group led by Tech experts gathers key data after major catastrophes to prepare for the next one

Alejandro Martinez collects data in Mexico after a major earthquake in September 2017. Martinez, MSCE 2012, Ph.D. 2015, was part of a team from the Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance Association that traveled to the impact zone to gather “perishable” data about the earthquake to help scientists and engineers prepare for future events. (Photo Courtesy of Geotechnical Extreme Events Reconnaissance Association via the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine)

Just days after a major earthquake struck central Mexico in September 2017, Alejandro Martinez, MSCE 2012, Ph.D. 2015, found himself at the site taking vital measurements of the disaster. “It was a shocking day for everyone,” Martinez says.

Tuesday, January 9, 2018

In the wake of Maria, two Tech alumni lead effort to restore water and sewer services in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20, 2017, based on MODIS/Terra satellite image and processed by Antti Lipponen. (Photo Courtesy Antti Lipponen via Wikimedia Commons)

As leaders of the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority, Eli Diaz and Ryan Arrieta have found themselves at the nexus of Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane Maria, which slammed into the island Sept. 20, 2017. For months, they’ve been working diligently to devise ways to restore water and sewer services to the people of Puerto Rico despite the loss of electricity and communications.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Students showcase final projects using origami engineering for social good

The Yoshi Group used a single Miura-ori based Yoshimura origami pattern to design four unique structures. From left, Phoebe Edalatpour, Jared Williams, Maria Yagnye and Emanuel Ferro hold models of their designs. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Want to get all that toothpaste out of the tube? How about provide shelter for homeless people or disaster victims? Glaucio Paulino's Origami Engineering class presented their interdisciplinary final projects using origami engineeering for social good in the Mason Building lobby Dec. 14.

Thursday, December 14, 2017

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Researchers work to make robots the first-responders after nuclear power plant disasters

International Atomic Energy Agency fact-finding team leader Mike Weightman examines Reactor Unit 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant on May 27, 2011. The team assessed damage from an earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 that caused three reactors at the plant to meltdown. (Photo: Gregg Webb / International Atomic Energy Agency)

Disasters at nuclear power plants present all kinds of problems for search and rescue teams, from lethal radiation exposure to danger from weakened structures. Associate Professor Yong Cho has begun work on a new project that could one day put robots on the ground in the immediate aftermath of a meltdown or other catastrophe, helping to rescue people trapped in the plant and contain dangerous nuclear material in situations where quick action is critical.

Thursday, June 1, 2017

Change agent: Many resist change, but John Taylor has made a career studying it

John E. Taylor, the new Frederick L. Olmsted Profession in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

John E. Taylor joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the summer of 2016 as the inaugural Frederick L. Olmsted Professor. Taylor studies the dynamics where human and engineered networks meet, making him an ideal fit for an endowed professorship named for the father of landscape architecture and a designer who believed engineered infrastructure should be both functional and aesthetically appealing, serving society’s needs while also creating more livable and healthy communities.

Monday, December 12, 2016

Two weeks in China and Japan teaches students about disaster engineering, Asian culture — and themselves

The International Disaster Reconnaissance Studies class on the Great Wall of China, one of their first stops during their two-week trip to China and Japan.

They climbed the Great Wall of China and explored the Forbidden City. They visited a town destroyed by an earthquake then preserved as a monument to the lives lost. They saw baby pandas and flood control systems, Japanese towns devastated by a tsunami and the Hiroshima memorial. But in the end, it was the relationships they built and an overnight summit of Mt. Fuji in Japan that etched this trip into the memories of four engineering students who traveled to China and Japan in early August.

Friday, August 26, 2016

10 years after Katrina, are American cities prepared for disasters?

Ahead of a Washington D.C. roundtable August 5 on disaster preparedness, Reginald DesRoches and Wayne Clough talked to the Georgia Tech News Center about the challenges for many of the country's communities. The conversation comes just a few weeks before the 10-year anniversary of the hurricane that devastated New Orleans and ravaged the Gulf Coast.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015
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