Georgia Department of Transportation

Capstone Expo winners create a simple solution that saves drivers tons of time at I-20 and I-285 in west Atlanta

Atlanta Cypress Engineering won the civil and environmental engineering award at the spring 2018 Capstone Design Expo. The team poses with the winning check. From right: Blane Solomon, Andrew Pofahl, Buzz, Alex Hare, and Ramiro Santana along with senior design professor John Koon. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

A simple design change with the potential of saving Atlanta drivers a combined year’s worth of travel time every day took home the civil and environmental engineering top prize at the Georgia Tech Capstone Design Expo April 24.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Desire to give back to Tech, next generation unite newest members of School’s advisory board

Five alumni joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering External Advisory Board in October: Richard Hummel, Orlando Mendez, Donald Paul, Meg Pirkle and I.J. Scott III. Each will serve six-year terms as outside counselors to the School’s leadership on everything from curriculum and student preparedness to fundraising and alumni outreach.

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering added expertise in bridge-building, transportation systems, investing, IT, and real estate development to its External Advisory Board this fall.

Friday, November 10, 2017

National group honors research using lasers and AI to automatically assess health of highway pavement and catalog road signs

Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers have earned an award for their work to automatically detect cracks, ruts and other pavement issues on the state's highways. Their system uses lasers and artificial intelligence to also detect and catalog roadside signs. This image shows an automatically detected pavement rut modeled in 3-D. (Image: James Tsai)

A leading, standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. And the work could save time and money for DOTs around the country.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

These two alumni help make Atlanta’s everyday commute better, saving drivers time and money

Traffic moves through the interchange at Ashford-Dunwoody Road and Interstate 285 in Atlanta's Perimeter area. The busy district is one of several areas where the Georgia Department of Transportation and some School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni at Kimley-Horn and Associates are using advanced technology and traffic signal timing to maximize the flow of traffic. (Photo Courtesy: Kimley-Horn and Associates)

The next time you’re sitting at a red light and cursing traffic, remember: it could be significantly worse. In fact, it would be worse for a number of major commuting corridors in the Atlanta area — if not for the efforts of people like two Georgia Tech civil engineering alumni who are involved in a pacesetting state program to make traffic flow more smoothly.

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

New corrosion-resistant concrete reinforcement wins AASHTO Sweet 16 award for extending life of coastal bridges

A group of Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers after they received an AASHTO Sweet Sixteen award from DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry Dec. 8. Their work on corrosion-resistant concrete piles for marine environments has been used on bridges in Georgia and is being tested for use in nearby states.

A leading standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. The work developed a new steel to reinforce concrete bridge piles in marine environments that withstands corrosion and lasts well beyond the expected 100-year lifespan of the structures.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Georgia DOT’s chief engineer on making history, why she loves her work, and why engineers need communication skills

Meg Pirkle, MSCE 1997

Just more than a year ago, Meg Pirkle took over as the chief engineer at the Georgia Department of Transportation. Pirkle sat down with us late in 2015 to talk more about her 26 years at the agency and share some thoughts about the importance of transportation engineering.

Thursday, February 25, 2016

2 alums among Georgia’s most influential people

Georgia Trend’s annual list of the 100 most influential people in Georgia includes two School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumni in 2015.

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Georgia DOT names first woman as chief engineer — and she’s a Ramblin’ Wreck from CEE

Meg Pirkle takes over as the Georgia Department of Transportation’s chief engineer January 1, the agency’s commissioner announced Dec. 11. Pirkle, M.S. 1996, is the first woman to serve in the position.

Friday, December 12, 2014
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