Hurricanes

Silence to sound: Looking at Twitter posts from 2017’s Hurricane Harvey shows lack of activity can tell first responders where trouble’s brewing

Floodwaters cover Port Arthur, Texas, on August 31, 2017, following Hurricane Harvey. Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez took this photo from a South Carolina Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during rescue operations following the storm. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez, U.S. Air National Guard)

With another hurricane season beginning June 1 — and some forecasters predicting another busy one — researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working on a tool to help first-responders use Twitter activity to identify developing crises after a storm while also helping civilians more effectively plug in to disaster response efforts.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

In the wake of Maria, two Tech alumni lead effort to restore water and sewer services in Puerto Rico

Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20, 2017, based on MODIS/Terra satellite image and processed by Antti Lipponen. (Photo Courtesy Antti Lipponen via Wikimedia Commons)

As leaders of the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority, Eli Diaz and Ryan Arrieta have found themselves at the nexus of Puerto Rico's recovery from Hurricane Maria, which slammed into the island Sept. 20, 2017. For months, they’ve been working diligently to devise ways to restore water and sewer services to the people of Puerto Rico despite the loss of electricity and communications.

Tuesday, January 2, 2018

Hurricanes vs. Stadiums: Stewart explains why the massive structures can withstand storms

SEC Country website screen shot of a story looking at the effects of major hurricanes on college football stadiums.

With Hurricane Matthew looming, college football programs throughout the Southeast had to consider the impact of the massive storm on their scheduled games Oct. 8. Two games has to be postponed — one indefinitely — prompting the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s SEC Country website to ask what would happen to a stadium in a major hurricane.

Monday, October 10, 2016

As hurricane season begins, how a Georgia Tech civil engineer created the five categories we use to classify storms

Hurricane Isabel, the strongest storm of the 2003 Atlantic hurricane season. (Photo: NASA)

After three relatively quiet years, forecasters predict we’ll see something close to a “normal” year in terms of hurricane activity in the Atlantic Ocean this year — 10 to 16 named storms with up to four of those considered major hurricanes. “Major” means a Category 3, 4 or 5 storm, a vernacular we wouldn’t have without School of Civil and Environmental Engineering alumnus Herbert Saffir.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016
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