Infrastructure

Amekudzi-Kennedy on Georgia infrastructure report card: Progress made, more to be done

Downtown Atlanta skyline with traffic on the I-75/I-85 Downtown Connector. (Photo: Fitrah Hamid)

The American Society of Civil Engineers released its assessment of Georgia’s infrastructure Jan. 23, and the word of the day might very well have been “momentum.”

Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Building a better foundation: Iris Tien accepts the challenge

Assistant Professer Iris Tien sits at her desk in her Georgia Tech office. (Photo: Allison Carter)

For Iris Tien every road, bridge, or building is a potential research project.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Tien picked to help lead working group for Atlanta’s ‘roadmap to resilience’

Downtown Atlanta skyline with the Downtown Connector and the eastern edge of Georgia Tech's campus. (Photo: Fitrah Hamid)

Iris Tien will co-lead a working group for the City of Atlanta’s efforts to address inadequate transportation systems and the related risks to the city’s broader infrastructure.

Friday, December 7, 2018

Coogan wins Air Force Young Investigator award to improve roads, pipes and other physical networks

This image from software developed by NASA shows air traffic across the United States. Assistant Professor Sam Coogan has received funding from the U.S. Air Force to use new techniques to understand and manage how physical networks with interconnected components function. His work applies to all kinds of systems, like roads, airspace, water systems and factories. (Image Courtesy: NASA)

Sam Coogan will use a Young Investigator grant from the U.S. Air Force to develop a new approach to understanding and controlling physical networks like roads, air space and other critical infrastructure.

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Tien, Lee win top paper award at Resilience Week 2018

Graduate student Cynthia Lee, left, and Assistant Professor Iris Tien with their first-place infrastructure paper aware at Resilience Week 2018. (Photo Courtesy: Iris Tien)

Two Georgia Tech researchers have won the first-place paper award in infrastructure at Resilience Week 2018 for their work using a variety of data sources to better understand and design infrastructure systems.

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Watkins extols virtues of parks as transportation infrastructure in 'Governing' op-ed

Screeen capture of Governing op-ed by Kari Watkins and Cathering Nagel, "Urban Parks' Emerging Role as Transportation Infrastructure"

Parks — especially linear parks — are emerging as viable and popular transportation corridors in cities around the country and connecting once-divided neighborhoods, according to a commentary published by Governing magazine Nov. 28.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Tien, Johansen win Resilience Week top award for paper on vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure

Chloe Johansen, left, and Iris Tien hold their first-place paper award at the Resilience Week 2017 conference for their work analyzing the vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure. They used Atlanta's water and power systems as a case study. (Photo Courtesy: Iris Tien)

Iris Tien and Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen won a top award at the Resilience Week 2017 conference for their paper on analyzing the vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

ARCS awards go to 4 grad students

Calvin Clark, Xenia Wirth, Osvaldo Broesicke and Anna Skipper, who have each earned a scholarship from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation for 2017.

Osvaldo Broesicke, Calvin Clark, Anna Skipper and Xenia Wirth have each earned more funding from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation to support their studies and open up opportunities to advance their research.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

New faculty member Sam Coogan connects civil and electrical engineering to run the transportation systems of tomorrow

Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

A new faculty member with one foot in electrical engineering and another in civil engineering is working to make sure the transportation systems of the future can accommodate all the different demands they will face, from self-driving cars to technologies we haven’t even imagined yet. Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Pages

Subscribe to Infrastructure