Infrastructure

New faculty member Sam Coogan connects civil and electrical engineering to run the transportation systems of tomorrow

Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

A new faculty member with one foot in electrical engineering and another in civil engineering is working to make sure the transportation systems of the future can accommodate all the different demands they will face, from self-driving cars to technologies we haven’t even imagined yet. Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

LISTEN: I-85 collapse provides Tien a test case of infrastructure interdependence

Assistant Professor Iris Tien, center, with WABE-FM's Jim Burress and Rose Scott after their conversation about Atlanta's infrastructure on the station's daily program Closer Look. (Photo Courtesy: WABE)

For a researcher who studies the ways society’s infrastructure systems are interconnected and interdependent, the Interstate 85 collapse this spring in Atlanta had a silver lining. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Iris Tien told Atlanta public radio station WABE that shutting down one of the city’s main thoroughfares presented a rare opportunity — despite the disruption to businesses and the extra travel time for residents.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Tien: Pipeline blast reminds us of our dependence on a few key infrastructure systems

Sierra Magazine story about the explosion at a gas pipeline in Alabama.

The shutdown of the Colonial Pipeline in Alabama after an explosion Oct. 31 underscores how little redundancy exists in many of our key infrastructure systems, according to the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Iris Tien.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen meets with her TI:GER program group in October 2016 to talk about their project. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, is working on an idea with Assistant Professor Iris Tien they think will make a difference in improving America's crumbling infrastructure. It's work with so much potential that Johansen is working with other Georgia Tech and Emory University graduate students to commercialize her research.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Tien: What we build builds communities

A neighborhood on the Westside of Atlanta, an example of the premise that has been stuck in Iris Tien's mind recently: how the infrastructure civil and environmental engineers build — or the lack thereof in areas like this — influences the surrounding community. (Photo: Iris Tien)

In a blog post for the Georgia Tech Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain, Iris Tien lays out the importance of civil infrastructure in building communities.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Tien invited to Arab-American Frontiers Symposium on sensing technology and applications

Some of the world’s brightest scholars gather in Saudi Arabia in December to talk about the latest advances in sensing technologies and networks. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Iris Tien has been invited to join them.

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

The National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them. The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

NSF funds $12M research network to build the healthy, sustainable, livable cities of the future

How will we build the cities of the future in a sustainable way? A new National Science Foundation-funded research network will connect scientists at nine universities with infrastructure groups, public policy experts, and industry partners to reimagine cities. Georgia Tech will be an anchor of the $12 million network, which will be led by the University of Minnesota, and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Ted Russell will serve as a co-director.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

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