Interval

Shahi produces best paper at fuzzy systems conference

Ph.D. student Shahrokh Shahi

Ph.D. student Shahrokh Shahi has won the Best Student Paper award at the 2019 joint World Congress of the International Fuzzy Systems Association and Annual Conference of the North American Fuzzy Information Processing Society.

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016
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