Jerry Qi

Origami, 3D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

Closeup of an origami structure created through Digital Light Processing 3D printing. (Photo: Christopher Moore)

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications in everything from biomedical devices to equipment used in space exploration. Until now, making such structures has involved multiple steps, more than one material, and assembly from smaller parts.

Monday, October 22, 2018

Paulino, Qi win Sigma Xi faculty award for 4-D printing research

Georgia Tech researchers Glaucio Paulino, left, and Jerry Qi hold 3-D printed objects that use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. They’ve developed a new way to create structures with “memory” that can expand dramatically when heated. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Glaucio Paulino and his collaborators in mechanical engineering have won Sigma Xi’s top award for faculty research published in 2017.

Wednesday, March 28, 2018

Researchers print objects that ‘remember’ their shape, allowing them to change dramatically when heated

Georgia Tech researchers Glaucio Paulino, left, and Jerry Qi hold 3-D printed objects that use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. They’ve developed a new way to create structures with “memory” that can expand dramatically when heated. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017
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