Journal Scientific Reports

Did a rogue wave help sink the El Faro? Fedele’s analysis supports NTSB investigation of ship lost in 2015 hurricane

The stern of the El Faro is shown on the ocean floor where it came to rest after sinking in Hurricane Joaquin in 2015. (Photo Courtesy: National Transportation Safety Board)

A new analysis done to support the investigation into the 2015 sinking of the El Faro cargo ship has calculated the likelihood of a massive rogue wave during Hurricane Joaquin in October of that year — and demonstrated a new technique for evaluating the probability of rogue waves over space and time.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Researchers print objects that ‘remember’ their shape, allowing them to change dramatically when heated

Georgia Tech researchers Glaucio Paulino, left, and Jerry Qi hold 3-D printed objects that use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. They’ve developed a new way to create structures with “memory” that can expand dramatically when heated. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017
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