Microbiome

NSF funds two new projects to understand greenhouse gas emissions from soil, expand microbial big-data analysis tools

Microbes in soil can break down nitrous oxide, N2O, into harmless nitrogen, N2, but they don't always do a good job, according to Professor Kostas Konstantinidis. He has a new grant from the National Science Foundation to understand why. The problem is that the nitrous oxide is a powerful and damaging greenhouse gas. The study will focus on agricultural land, where nitrogen is often added to soil as fertilizer, and tropical forests. (Image Courtesy: Kostas Konstantinidis)

Kostas Konstantinidis has received two new grants from the National Science Foundation that promise to help researchers better understand some of the tiniest organisms on the planet.

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

National Academy invites Konstantinidis to join young leaders at Arab-American Frontiers symposium

Professor Kostas Konstantinidis, who will attend the 2018 Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering and Medicine at the invitation of the National Academy of Science. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Kostas Konstantinidis will join a select group of outstanding engineers, scientists and medical professionals in Kuwait this fall at the invitation of the National Academy of Science and the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Dynamic model helps scientists understand healthy lakes to heal sick ones

Lake Mendota near Madison, Wisconsin. Georgia Tech researchers used long-term data on the lake’s microbial communities to develop what may be the largest-ever dynamic model of how those communities interact. The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Kostas Konstantinidis says that could help restore sick lakes and may one day help scientists better understand the human body’s microbiome. (Photo: Good Free Photos)

Development of a dynamic model for microbial populations in healthy lakes could help scientists understand what’s wrong with sick lakes, prescribe cures and predict what may happen as environmental conditions change. Those are among the benefits expected from an ambitious project to model the interactions of some 18,000 species in a well-studied Wisconsin lake.

Thursday, April 7, 2016
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