Oceans

Unlocking the mystery of methane clathrates — on Earth and on our solar system’s icy moons

Structure of a methane clathrate block found embedded in sediment in the subduction zone off Oregon’s coast. A German research ship found this hydrate roughly 4,000 feet below the ocean’s surface in the top layer of the ocean floor. (Photo Courtesy: Wusel007 via Wikimedia Commons)

Trillions of cubic feet of natural gas are thought to lie in cold storage within Earth’s permafrost and under its oceans. That gas, however, is trapped within cage-like chemical structures called methane clathrates. Scientists are very interested in these structures, because they may have cousins hidden under the surface of the icy moons in the outer solar system.

Friday, April 19, 2019

OceanVisions initiative will foster design, research that ensures healthy oceans for future generations

OceanVisions: Science and Engineering to enable solutions, an initiative of the Georgia Tech Ocean Science & Engineering program, the Smithsonian Ocean Portal, Stanford Center for Ocean Solutions, Scripps Institute of Oceanography, and Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. (Image: Emanuele Di Lorenzo)

Researchers at Georgia Tech, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the Smithsonian Institution, and Stanford University are leading an initiative to ensure the health of oceans for generations to come. Called OceanVisions, the initiative envisions healthy oceans for all inhabitants of Earth and for all users and uses of the open seas enabled by advances in science and engineering.

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Georgia Tech launches Ph.D. in ocean science and engineering

Ocean Science and Engineering webpage screenshot

Georgia Tech now offers an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in Ocean Science and Engineering. The new program aims to train ocean scientists and engineers by combining basic and applied sciences with innovative ocean technologies.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Global warming, a dead zone and mysterious bacteria

Researchers Liz Robertson from the University of Southern Denmark and Josh Manger from the University of California, San Diego, ready a sample collector off Mexico's Pacific coast. They’re part of a research team that discovered bacteria making oxygen minimum zones in the ocean even deader by sucking up all life-giving nitrogen molecules. (Photo: Heather Olins)

In ocean expanses where oxygen has vanished, newly discovered bacteria are diminishing additional life molecules. They help make virtual dead zones even deader. Now, a team led by the Georgia Institute of Technology has discovered members of a highly prolific bacteria group known as SAR11 living in the world’s largest oxygen minimum zone. The team has produced unambiguous evidence that the bacteria play a major role in denitrification.

Monday, August 8, 2016
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