Proceedings of the Royal Society A

New software speeds origami structure designs

Researchers Glaucio Paulino (left) and Ke Liu with origami structures that can be simulated in new software. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have developed a new computer-aided approach that streamlines the design process for origami-based structures, making it easier for engineers and scientists to conceptualize new ideas graphically while simultaneously generating the underlying mathematical data needed to build the structure in the real world.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Understanding landslide-generated tsunamis — and predicting their impact

A simulated landslide splashes into a wave basin at Oregon State University.

Scientists better understand the formation of rare but deadly kinds of tsunamis as a result of first-of-their-kind experiments by two Georgia Tech researchers.

Monday, June 27, 2016

‘Reprogramming’ structures: Paulino’s team creates another new origami design that can be reconfigured for multiple uses

Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, may soon provide a foundation for antennas that can reconfigure themselves to operate at different frequencies, microfluidic devices whose properties can change in operation – and even heating and air-conditioning ductwork that adjusts to demand. The applications could result from reconfigurable and reprogrammable origami tubes developed by researchers at three institutions, including the Georgia Institute of Technology. By changing the ways in which the paper is folded, the same tube can have six or more different cross sections.

Thursday, January 28, 2016
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