Structural Engineering

Building a better foundation: Iris Tien accepts the challenge

Assistant Professer Iris Tien sits at her desk in her Georgia Tech office. (Photo: Allison Carter)

For Iris Tien every road, bridge, or building is a potential research project.

Wednesday, January 23, 2019

Shocking experiences keep Nylen going back for more

Ph.D. student and Sandia National Labs intern Rebecca Nylen kneels next to blasted steel cylinders, some of her handy work as a computational shock physicist. (Photo: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories)

If you didn’t know better, you’d think Rebecca Nylen had a terrible start to her summer internship.

Friday, September 7, 2018

Steel construction group honors White with lifetime achievement award

Professor Don White, who has received a lifetime achievement award from the American Institute of Steel Construction.

The American Institute of Steel Construction has honored Donald White with a lifetime achievement award for his work advancing the use of structural steel.

Thursday, April 12, 2018

ASCE picks Saini for Ammann Research Fellowship

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini, one of the American Society of Civil Engineers' O.H. Ammann Research Fellows in Structural Engineering for this year. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini has earned the support of the American Society of Civil Engineers for his work on structural reliability and resilience.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Yavari’s new project will lay a mathematical foundation for cloaking structures

Professor Arash Yavari stands in front of his packed bookcase in his Mason Building office. Yavari has embarked upon a four-year research project to lay the mathematical foundations for cloaking structures from earthquakes and other stress waves. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Can you hide a building from a stress wave, like an earthquake or even some kind of blast or explosion? If that kind of “cloaking” were possible, it could shape how we design critical structures like nuclear power plants. Arash Yavari has started a new four-year, half-million dollar federally funded project to lay the mathematical foundations for that kind of technology and explore if it’s theoretically possible while still respecting the laws of physics.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Project balancing economics, historic preservation, community needs wins over Capstone Design Expo judges

Team J2AD Engineering won the civil and environmental engineering award at the fall 2017 Capston Design Expo. From left, Jessie Lei, Jiyoon Oh, Austin Foo and Donald Smith accept their winnings from Buzz (yellow jacket, center). (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

The winning civil and environmental engineering project at this fall 2017 Capstone Design Expo doesn’t sound especially groundbreaking on paper. But in reality, it’s the kind of work that demonstrates the power engineers have to shape — and in this case, protect — communities.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

REPLAY: Watch the Georgia Dome implosion with structural engineer Lauren Stewart

A split-screen shot shows the very beginning and the aftermath of the Georgia Dome implosion Nov. 20, with nothing but a dust cloud remaining. (Photos: Zonglin "Jack" Li)

Leading up the implosion of the Georgia Dome, the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Lauren Stewart joined Georgia Tech’s Jason Maderer on Facebook Live to explain the process and offer an engineer’s perspective on taking down such a massive structure.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Goodno publishes new hybrid statics and mechanics textbook

Part of the cover of Barry Goodno's new textbook, "Statics and Mechanics of Materials," co-written with James Gere. The new text offers a coordinated approach to both foundational courses in mechanics, according to Goodno. (Image Courtesy: Cengage and Barry Goodno)

The first edition of Barry Goodno’s new textbook, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, arrived in stores and online retailers in October.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

New software speeds origami structure designs

Researchers Glaucio Paulino (left) and Ke Liu with origami structures that can be simulated in new software. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have developed a new computer-aided approach that streamlines the design process for origami-based structures, making it easier for engineers and scientists to conceptualize new ideas graphically while simultaneously generating the underlying mathematical data needed to build the structure in the real world.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Lindsey tells Global Atlanta her internship in Nepal showed her the power of earthquake engineering to improve lives, communities

Undergraduate Maggie Lindsey, left, with structural engineer Priyanka Singh in the main room of the Gaddi Baithak in Kathmandu, Nepal. Lindsey was an intern with Miyamoto International in the country during spring 2017, where she worked on a project to restore the 100-year-old palace. (Photo: Binod Shrestha)

When civil engineering senior Maggie Lindsey went looking for an internship abroad, she couldn’t find exactly what she was looking for. She needed to complete the requirements for her global engineering leadership minor, and she wanted her global practicum experience to have a good balance of engineering and human compassion, she told international business news website Global Atlanta.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Pages

Subscribe to Structural Engineering