Structural Engineering

ASCE picks Saini for Ammann Research Fellowship

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini, one of the American Society of Civil Engineers' O.H. Ammann Research Fellows in Structural Engineering for this year. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini has earned the support of the American Society of Civil Engineers for his work on structural reliability and resilience.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Yavari’s new project will lay a mathematical foundation for cloaking structures

Professor Arash Yavari stands in front of his packed bookcase in his Mason Building office. Yavari has embarked upon a four-year research project to lay the mathematical foundations for cloaking structures from earthquakes and other stress waves. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Can you hide a building from a stress wave, like an earthquake or even some kind of blast or explosion? If that kind of “cloaking” were possible, it could shape how we design critical structures like nuclear power plants. Arash Yavari has started a new four-year, half-million dollar federally funded project to lay the mathematical foundations for that kind of technology and explore if it’s theoretically possible while still respecting the laws of physics.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Project balancing economics, historic preservation, community needs wins over Capstone Design Expo judges

Team J2AD Engineering won the civil and environmental engineering award at the fall 2017 Capston Design Expo. From left, Jessie Lei, Jiyoon Oh, Austin Foo and Donald Smith accept their winnings from Buzz (yellow jacket, center). (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

The winning civil and environmental engineering project at this fall 2017 Capstone Design Expo doesn’t sound especially groundbreaking on paper. But in reality, it’s the kind of work that demonstrates the power engineers have to shape — and in this case, protect — communities.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

REPLAY: Watch the Georgia Dome implosion with structural engineer Lauren Stewart

A split-screen shot shows the very beginning and the aftermath of the Georgia Dome implosion Nov. 20, with nothing but a dust cloud remaining. (Photos: Zonglin "Jack" Li)

Leading up the implosion of the Georgia Dome, the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Lauren Stewart joined Georgia Tech’s Jason Maderer on Facebook Live to explain the process and offer an engineer’s perspective on taking down such a massive structure.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Goodno publishes new hybrid statics and mechanics textbook

Part of the cover of Barry Goodno's new textbook, "Statics and Mechanics of Materials," co-written with James Gere. The new text offers a coordinated approach to both foundational courses in mechanics, according to Goodno. (Image Courtesy: Cengage and Barry Goodno)

The first edition of Barry Goodno’s new textbook, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, arrived in stores and online retailers in October.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

New software speeds origami structure designs

Researchers Glaucio Paulino (left) and Ke Liu with origami structures that can be simulated in new software. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have developed a new computer-aided approach that streamlines the design process for origami-based structures, making it easier for engineers and scientists to conceptualize new ideas graphically while simultaneously generating the underlying mathematical data needed to build the structure in the real world.

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Lindsey tells Global Atlanta her internship in Nepal showed her the power of earthquake engineering to improve lives, communities

Undergraduate Maggie Lindsey, left, with structural engineer Priyanka Singh in the main room of the Gaddi Baithak in Kathmandu, Nepal. Lindsey was an intern with Miyamoto International in the country during spring 2017, where she worked on a project to restore the 100-year-old palace. (Photo: Binod Shrestha)

When civil engineering senior Maggie Lindsey went looking for an internship abroad, she couldn’t find exactly what she was looking for. She needed to complete the requirements for her global engineering leadership minor, and she wanted her global practicum experience to have a good balance of engineering and human compassion, she told international business news website Global Atlanta.

Friday, August 11, 2017

National media tap Tech structural engineering, transportation expertise after I-85 bridge collapses

Lauren Stewart talks with WSB-TV's Tom Regan about the Interstate 85 bridge collapse in Atlanta. Stewart said coordinated investigationsof the cause, cleanup of the site, and reconstruction of the highway will likely take months. She was among a handful of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers who offered their engineering expertise to Atlanta and national media in the wake of the disaster. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Reporters looking for insight into the collapse of the Interstate 85 bridge in Atlanta talked with four School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professors in the hours afterward in an effort to understand how the structure crumbled.

Friday, March 31, 2017

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Hurricanes vs. Stadiums: Stewart explains why the massive structures can withstand storms

SEC Country website screen shot of a story looking at the effects of major hurricanes on college football stadiums.

With Hurricane Matthew looming, college football programs throughout the Southeast had to consider the impact of the massive storm on their scheduled games Oct. 8. Two games has to be postponed — one indefinitely — prompting the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s SEC Country website to ask what would happen to a stadium in a major hurricane.

Monday, October 10, 2016

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