Sustainability

NSF awards graduate fellowship to Francisco for work helping people understand their energy use and act more sustainably

Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has received a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

If we tell people how they’re using energy, can we encourage them to conserve and change their behavior? That question drives School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has just learned the National Science Foundation is supporting her work through a graduate research fellowship.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Jin wins ACI scholarship for his work on concrete sustainability

Ph.D. student Bill Jin, this year's winner of the Robert H. Kuhlman Student Scholarship from the Georgia chapter of the American Concrete Institute.

The Georgia chapter of the American Concrete Institute has awarded Ph.D. student Bill Jin $5,000 to support his studies and his research into green concrete material technology.

Thursday, January 4, 2018

Brosofsky’s natural herbicide project wins national higher ed sustainability award

Grace Brosofsky, BSEnvE 2017, stands with her Student Sustainability Leadership award from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. (Photo Courtesy: Grace Brosofsky)

For years, newly minted alumna Grace Brosofsky has been driven to find a safe, organic way to control weeds.

Monday, October 30, 2017

ARCS awards go to 4 grad students

Calvin Clark, Xenia Wirth, Osvaldo Broesicke and Anna Skipper, who have each earned a scholarship from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation for 2017.

Osvaldo Broesicke, Calvin Clark, Anna Skipper and Xenia Wirth have each earned more funding from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation to support their studies and open up opportunities to advance their research.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Study abroad and sustainability in the world's largest city

Students in the Japan Program on Sustainable Development traveled all over Japan during the first week of the program and saw some iconic landmarks, like this "floating" torii gate on the island Miyajima. The group includes students from Georgia Tech, Tokyo Tech in Japan, and faculty members from Tech’s College of Engineering. (Photo: Alexandra Akosa)

Tokyo, the largest metropolitan area in the world, is home to almost 38 million people. While “sustainability” might not be the word that comes to mind upon hearing about a city of this size and magnitude, the city manages to grow without depleting of Japan’s natural resources. That's why Tokyo was chosen as the setting for the new Japan Program on Sustainable Development — a collaboration between Georgia Tech's College of Engineering and Tokyo Tech.

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Kennedy keynotes University of Toronto E-week research day

Professor Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy (Photo: Zonglin "Jack" Li)

Professor Adjo Amekudzi-Kennedy delivered the keynote address for the University of Toronto Centre for Global Engineering’s Research Day March 17, focusing on sustainability thinking.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Building healthier cities: 10 questions with Ted Russell

Howard T. Tellepsen Chair Armistead "Ted" Russell (Photo: Justen Clay/Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine)

Tech Environmental Engineering Professor Armistead “Ted” Russell has traveled the world, including China, India and Minneapolis, studying air quality and its impacts on urban life. He is also part of a team of scientists, policymakers and industrialists working with a U.S. National Science Foundation Sustainability Research Network to build better cities.

Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Liquid Assets: Tech researchers are working to solve the world’s water problems

Water drop

From the drinking-water contamination in Flint, Mich., to the seemingly endless drought in California, good old H2O pools at the heart of many of today’s most pressing and headline-grabbing problems. Find out how the work and ideas of Tech researchers are helping us understand — and solve — these planet-wide challenges.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Change agent: Many resist change, but John Taylor has made a career studying it

John E. Taylor, the new Frederick L. Olmsted Profession in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

John E. Taylor joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the summer of 2016 as the inaugural Frederick L. Olmsted Professor. Taylor studies the dynamics where human and engineered networks meet, making him an ideal fit for an endowed professorship named for the father of landscape architecture and a designer who believed engineered infrastructure should be both functional and aesthetically appealing, serving society’s needs while also creating more livable and healthy communities.

Monday, December 12, 2016

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