Taj Mahal

Burning trash in India major cause of Taj Mahal discoloration, leads to hundreds of premature deaths

The Taj Mahal (Photo: Michael Bergin)

Researchers from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have found burning trash around the Taj Mahal is not only a major factor in the monument’s discoloration, it’s contributing to hundreds of premature deaths each year. The new study, published Oct. 7 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, builds on previous work that led local communities to ban burning of cow dung cakes, a common cooking fuel.

Friday, October 7, 2016

How much garbage is burned each day in India? Times of India highlights Russell study

Last year, School of Civil and Environmental Engineers pinned the yellowing and browning of the Taj Mahal on air pollution — specifically airborne carbon particles and dust. Now they’ve found one of the primary sources of those pollutants: large-scale open burning of garbage.

Monday, November 2, 2015

What’s discoloring the Taj Mahal? Georgia Tech scientists have figured it out

The Taj Mahal’s iconic marble dome and soaring minarets require regular cleaning to maintain their dazzling appearance, and scientists now know why. Researchers from the United States and India are pointing the finger at airborne carbon particles and dust for giving the gleaming white landmark a brownish cast.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014
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