Environmental Engineering

Rising tundra temperatures create worrying changes in microbial communities

Researchers studied the impact of warming on microbial communities in a tundra area near Denali National Park in Alaska. (Photo: Ted Schuur, Northern Arizona University)

Rising temperatures in the tundra of the Earth’s northern latitudes could affect microbial communities in ways likely to increase their production of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide, a new study of experimentally warmed Alaskan soil suggests.

Monday, July 8, 2019

Pavlostathis honored for connecting education, research, practice with medal named for former Tech professor

Professor Spyros Pavlostathis

When Spyros Pavlostathis joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1991, he replaced a long-time professor named Frederick Pohland. When Spyros Pavlostathis joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1991, he replaced a long-time professor named Frederick Pohland.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The next frontier in air quality: Kaiser studies the precursors to pollution to improve our cities’ air

Graphic of cars, trucks and buses with clouds of smoke and a hazy city skyline. Text: The Next Frontier in Air Quality - Finding new ways to understand air pollution. (Graphic: Sarah Collins)

Atlanta’s pollutants create a perfect research setting for Jennifer Kaiser, an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech. Kaiser leads research focused on the emissions and chemistry of air pollutants, working to understand how nature and humans contribute to air pollution. Understanding those processes, she said, will help local, regional and global leaders make better policy.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Johnston, Zhang produce two of Georgia Tech’s best Ph.D. dissertations this year

Former Ph.D. students Shelly Zhang and Eric Johnston, who have won the Sigma Xi Best Ph.D. Thesis award for 2019.

Sigma Xi has recognized the work of two recently graduated civil and environmental engineering doctoral students as some of the best of the year at Georgia Tech.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Better water purification without the byproducts of using chlorine

Water pouring from a faucet. (Photo Courtesy: Steve Johnson via Flickr)

What if there was a way to reliably decontaminate water without using chlorine and generating the resulting disinfection byproducts?

Thursday, March 7, 2019

Koon elected to National Academy of Engineering

Professor of the Practice John Koon talks teaches his Senior Design class on a recent Thursday. Koon is one of the newest members of the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest honors for the nation's engineers. (Photo: Amelia Neumeister)

An hour after the National Academy of Engineering announced John Koon was one of its newest members, he was doing what he does every Thursday: teaching his Senior Design course. Never mind that election to the NAE is one of the most prestigious honors — perhaps THE most prestigious — an engineer can receive.

Friday, February 8, 2019

Marshall Commission names Jackie Knee the 2019 Marshall Sherfield Fellow

Ph.D. student Jackie Knee

Put simply, Jackie Knee wants to make people healthier. She’s worked at that singular goal in rural Thailand as a Fulbright Fellow, in the United States at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and at Georgia Tech as a fifth-year Ph.D. student in environmental engineering. Once she finishes her degree later this year, she’ll continue it in Britain as the 2019 Marshall Sherfield Fellow.

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Scientific American highlights Brown’s work understanding the behavioral obstacles to getting people clean water

Screenshot of Scientific American/Knowable Magazine story, "How Humans Get in the Way of Clean Water," which features an image of a silver tap with water flowing out.

Scientific American and Knowable Magazine have highlighted a growing understanding among clean water researchers about the most difficult challenge they face.

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Clough, Crittenden co-author National Academy report on grand challenges in environmental engineering

Cover design for the new National Academy of Engineering report, "Environmental Engineering for the 21st Century: Address Grand Challenges." It features the Earth in the center with photos around the circumference of a child drinking water from a spigot, a piece of glacier breaking off, a bulldozer atop piles of trash, a city skyline, and professional-looking people gathered around a laptop.

Professor John Crittenden and President Emeritus G. Wayne Clough have helped chart the course for the future of environmental engineering in a new report from the National Academy of Engineering. Environmental Engineering for the 21st Century: Address Grand Challenges lays out five grand challenges facing society that environmental engineers are uniquely positioned to address — but answering these challenges will require an evolution in environmental engineering education, research and practice, according to the report.

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Growing pile of human and animal waste harbors threats, opportunities

The global amount of recoverable fecal waste harbors risks, such as water contamination, but also opportunities to harvest natural resources. A new study from Carlton S. Wilder Assistant Professor Joe Brown, left, and others at Georgia Tech has determined just how much of that recoverable biomass exists. Here, Brown is pictured with former student Andrew Loo. (Photo: Gary Meek)

As demand for meat and dairy products increases across the world, much attention has landed on how livestock impact the environment, from land usage to greenhouse gas emissions. Now researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are highlighting another effect from animals raised for food and the humans who eat them: the waste they all leave behind.

Wednesday, November 28, 2018

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