Environmental Engineering

Covid-19 Response: Wastewater-Based Epidemiology

Associate Professor Joe Brown is among 60 researchers who have created a global collaborative to learn more about the spread of Covid-19 through wastewater. In a paper published in Environmental Science & Technology, the researchers explained that RNA from the coronavirus is shed in the feces of those infected with Covid-19. This allows researchers to survey sewage for virus RNA, a process they refer to as wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE).

Friday, October 9, 2020

Huang Appointed Turnipseed Family Chair

Professor Ching-Hua Huang has been appointed the Turnipseed Family Chair, a new endowed position in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

Student Team Creates Microplastics Detection Device

The four members of the student team River Recon pose in front of the Atlanta skyline

Covid-19 forced the academic year to be completed remotely, but it didn’t stop hardworking students from showcasing their impressive senior design projects. The spring 2020 design teams gave their presentations virtually in lieu of the Capstone Design Expo that typically marks the end of the semester for graduating seniors.  

Friday, June 12, 2020

Luo receives ACS Graduate Student Award

The American Chemical Society has honored a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering doctoral student for his research productivity and academic performance.

Thursday, April 2, 2020

Research: Water Pipe Technology Kills Microorganisms with Localized Electric Field

An illustration depicts how the device would inactivate pathogens in drinking water using an electic field

Researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have developed a device that kills pathogens in drinking water using an electric field. The tubular system can fit inside water distributions systems to deliver safe drinking water.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Energy Regulation Rollbacks Threaten Progress Against Harmful Ozone

Coal-fired power plant in central Wyoming billowing smoke

Pollutants from coal-fired power plants help make ground-level ozone, and a warming world exacerbates that. Recent rollbacks of U.S. energy regulations may speed climate change, keep pollutants coming, and thus slow the fight against harmful ozone, according to a new study.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Rising tundra temperatures create worrying changes in microbial communities

Researchers studied the impact of warming on microbial communities in a tundra area near Denali National Park in Alaska. (Photo: Ted Schuur, Northern Arizona University)

Rising temperatures in the tundra of the Earth’s northern latitudes could affect microbial communities in ways likely to increase their production of greenhouse gases methane and carbon dioxide, a new study of experimentally warmed Alaskan soil suggests.

Monday, July 8, 2019

Pavlostathis honored for connecting education, research, practice with medal named for former Tech professor

Professor Spyros Pavlostathis

When Spyros Pavlostathis joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1991, he replaced a long-time professor named Frederick Pohland. When Spyros Pavlostathis joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1991, he replaced a long-time professor named Frederick Pohland.

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

The next frontier in air quality: Kaiser studies the precursors to pollution to improve our cities’ air

Graphic of cars, trucks and buses with clouds of smoke and a hazy city skyline. Text: The Next Frontier in Air Quality - Finding new ways to understand air pollution. (Graphic: Sarah Collins)

Atlanta’s pollutants create a perfect research setting for Jennifer Kaiser, an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech. Kaiser leads research focused on the emissions and chemistry of air pollutants, working to understand how nature and humans contribute to air pollution. Understanding those processes, she said, will help local, regional and global leaders make better policy.

Monday, April 22, 2019

Johnston, Zhang produce two of Georgia Tech’s best Ph.D. dissertations this year

Former Ph.D. students Shelly Zhang and Eric Johnston, who have won the Sigma Xi Best Ph.D. Thesis award for 2019.

Sigma Xi has recognized the work of two recently graduated civil and environmental engineering doctoral students as some of the best of the year at Georgia Tech.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

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