Environmental Engineering

What’s discoloring the Taj Mahal? Georgia Tech scientists have figured it out

The Taj Mahal’s iconic marble dome and soaring minarets require regular cleaning to maintain their dazzling appearance, and scientists now know why. Researchers from the United States and India are pointing the finger at airborne carbon particles and dust for giving the gleaming white landmark a brownish cast.

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

Computational tools will help identify microbes in complex environmental samples

<p>Microbes of interest to clinicians and environmental scientists rarely exist in isolation. Organisms essential to breaking down pollutants or causing illness live in complex communities, and separating one microbe from hundreds of companion species can be challenging for researchers seeking to understand environmental issues or disease processes. A new National Science Foundation-supported project will provide computational tools designed to help identify and characterize the gene diversity of the residents of these microbial communities.</p>

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

How a combo of vinegar and citrus fruit oil could help Georgia Tech reduce herbicide use

If first-year Georgia Tech student Grace Brosofsky has her way, all of the landscaping across the Tech campus will be maintained without using any chemical herbicides in the coming years. And the whole idea grew out of a conflict between her parents over how to best keep their north Georgia lawn weed-free.

Thursday, October 30, 2014

Russell co-authors paper on sustainable infrastructure curriculum in NAE Bridge

A paper outlining a new approach to teaching about sustainability and infrastructure co-authored by Armistead Russell appears in the just-published fall issue of The Bridge, the signature publication of the National Academy of Engineering. The paper covers the development, implementation and assessment of a new summer course they have delivered over the last two years.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Koon wins Lifetime Achievement Award for contributions to water quality

The Water Environment Federation has recognized Professor John Koon’s contributions to water quality with a lifetime achievement award. Koon accepted the award at the federation’s Technical Exhibition and Conference (WEFTEC) this week in New Orleans.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

New mass spectrometer will help Bergin, Russell figure out what’s in the air

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professors Armistead Russell and Michael Bergin are part of a research group that has just won funding from the National Science Foundation to purchase a state-of-the-art, high-resolution mass spectrometer.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Crowdsourcing could lead to better water in rural India

With more than 10 million service points, India’s rural drinking water system provides a real monitoring headache for public health officials. To help address the challenge, a three-continent research consortium is evaluating a novel environmental crowdsourcing technique that relies on 53-cent test kits and the nation’s ubiquitous mobile phone service.

Friday, September 19, 2014

How Do Microbes Respond to More Acidic Oceans? NSF Funds Konstantinidis Study to Find Out

Kostas Konstantinidis has won National Science Foundation funding to study the impact of ocean acidification on micro-organisms. The award is part of a round of grants focused on the affects of lower pH on the world's seas. Researchers will also study the ability of coral reefs to adapt and create new, compact ocean instruments.

Monday, September 15, 2014

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