Geosystems Engineering

Arson Selected for National Science Foundation’s BRITE Award

A portrait of Associate Professor Chloe Arson with trees in the background

Associate Professor Chloé Arson has been selected for a 2021 BRITE Award from the National Science Foundation, providing funding that will allow her to take her research in a new direction. 

Tuesday, January 11, 2022

CEE Researchers Awarded $1M to Develop Technology for Converting Trash into Fuel

A silver ruler in the lower third of the photograph provides scale for small pieces of municipal solid waste

Researchers from Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have received $1.1 million from the U.S. Department of Energy to create equipment to efficiently convert non-recyclable municipal waste into jet fuel. 

 

Tuesday, December 14, 2021

Modeling Water-cleansing Wetlands in Extreme Weather

Researchers Chloé Arson, Thomas DiChristina, and Martial Taillefert stand near wetlands on Georgia Tech’s campus

The cycle of rising temperatures leads to increases in precipitation as well as droughts.  But what impact will these weather extremes, especially heavier precipitation, have on the earth’s most effective water cleansers – wetland sediments?  Chloé Arson, Thomas DiChristina, and Martial Taillefert near wetlands on Georgia Tech’s campus

Thursday, November 4, 2021

New Research Center Will Study Mine Tailings and Industrial Waste

The Akyem Mine TSF Cell 1 (background) and TSF Cell 2 (foreground) at a tailings storage facility in Ghana.

A new research center called TAILENG, headquartered at Georgia Tech, has been established to study mine tailings and industrial waste.

Thursday, July 9, 2020

Dai Wins Prestigious NSF CAREER Award

Sheng Dai

Assistant Professor Sheng Dai has won a 2020 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation.

Monday, March 2, 2020

Burns Named 2020 Engineer of the Year

Professor Susan Burns, associate chair of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Georgia Tech, has been selected as the 2020 Engineer of the Year by the Georgia Society of Professional Engineers.  

Monday, February 17, 2020

Researchers Receive $1.7 Million Grant to Build Robot for Sub-surface Soil Exploration

rendering of the proposed "Burrowing Robot with Integrated Sensing System"

An interdisciplinary research group from Georgia Tech has received a grant from the National Science Foundation to design an advanced self-propelled robot to explore the subsurface and record a range of signals as it advances.

 

Friday, December 6, 2019

NSF workshop sets out to define ‘bio-inspired geotechnics’ and lay groundwork for new collaborations

Alejandro Martinez welcomes engineers, biologists, physicists and others to the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics in May at the University of California, Davis. The unique gathering aimed to better define the emerging field of bio-inspired geotechnics and connect researchers from a broad range of disciplines to collaborate on groundbreaking ideas in the area. (Photo: Noah Pflueger-Peters/UC Davis)

A melting pot of experts with research interests as diverse as geotechnical engineering, termite burrowing, tree physiology, granular physics and soft robotics trickled in from around the world in late May for the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics. The NSF-funded workshop brought together 60 experts from engineering and science research, as well as industry, to foster dialogue and collaborations to better establish the field of bio-inspired geotechnics.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Unlocking the mystery of methane clathrates — on Earth and on our solar system’s icy moons

Structure of a methane clathrate block found embedded in sediment in the subduction zone off Oregon’s coast. A German research ship found this hydrate roughly 4,000 feet below the ocean’s surface in the top layer of the ocean floor. (Photo Courtesy: Wusel007 via Wikimedia Commons)

Trillions of cubic feet of natural gas are thought to lie in cold storage within Earth’s permafrost and under its oceans. That gas, however, is trapped within cage-like chemical structures called methane clathrates. Scientists are very interested in these structures, because they may have cousins hidden under the surface of the icy moons in the outer solar system.

Friday, April 19, 2019

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