Smart Cities

North Ave Smart Corridor wins mobility award at international Smart City Expo

Screenshot of North Avenue Smart Corridor: One Year Later video, with student riding a scooter on separated bike path and traffic in vehicle lanes.

The City of Atlanta’s North Avenue Smart Corridor Project was recognized as an innovative and transformative program during a leading international summit on smart cities.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Our autonomous transportation future: New Dickerson Chair Srinivas Peeta and the human-vehicle-infrastructure connections to make that future a reality

Srinivas Peeta, the new Frederick R. Dickerson Chair in the School of CIvil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo Luke Xinjing Xu)

The world of fully autonomous vehicles is inevitable, according to one of the newest faculty members in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The question is, how do we get there with the right policies and investments — and without so many bumps in the road that public trust erodes along the way.

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Guin helps lead connected vehicle master plan for Gwinnett, one of four inaugural Georgia Smart Communities

Georgia Smart Communities Challenge graphic with the state of Georgia and the four winning communities, Albany, Chamblee, Chatham County and Gwinnett County.

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researcher Angshuman Guin will lead research efforts in a new partnership with Gwinnett County announced June 12 to improve vehicle mobility and reduce crashes.

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Silence to sound: Looking at Twitter posts from 2017’s Hurricane Harvey shows lack of activity can tell first responders where trouble’s brewing

Floodwaters cover Port Arthur, Texas, on August 31, 2017, following Hurricane Harvey. Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez took this photo from a South Carolina Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during rescue operations following the storm. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez, U.S. Air National Guard)

With another hurricane season beginning June 1 — and some forecasters predicting another busy one — researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working on a tool to help first-responders use Twitter activity to identify developing crises after a storm while also helping civilians more effectively plug in to disaster response efforts.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

NSF awards graduate fellowship to Francisco for work helping people understand their energy use and act more sustainably

Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has received a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

If we tell people how they’re using energy, can we encourage them to conserve and change their behavior? That question drives School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has just learned the National Science Foundation is supporting her work through a graduate research fellowship.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Coogan wins CAREER grant to build mathematical foundation for modeling and predicting traffic flow

Cars speed along the Interstate 75/Interstate 85 Downtown Connector in Atlanta. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Samuel Coogan says we have an unprecedented opportunity in the coming years to reshape how we operate our transportation systems. With the support of the National Science Foundation, he's going to take advantage.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

National group honors research using lasers and AI to automatically assess health of highway pavement and catalog road signs

Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers have earned an award for their work to automatically detect cracks, ruts and other pavement issues on the state's highways. Their system uses lasers and artificial intelligence to also detect and catalog roadside signs. This image shows an automatically detected pavement rut modeled in 3-D. (Image: James Tsai)

A leading, standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. And the work could save time and money for DOTs around the country.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Energy, emissions and a smarter North Ave: Hunter, Guensler crunch data from new smart corridor to improve traffic, safety

Associate Professor Michael Hunter stands along North Avenue, the City of Atlanta's new "smart corridor." Along with the city, the Georgia Department of Transportation and other partners, Hunter will help cut the ribbon for the corridor Sept. 14. (Photo: Chris Moore)

The City of Atlanta will officially cut the ribbon on the North Avenue “smart corridor” Sept. 14, unveiling what city officials call the most-connected corridor in the state and a living laboratory for traffic management. It’s a partnership between the city, Georgia Department of Transportation, Georgia Tech and others.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

LISTEN: I-85 collapse provides Tien a test case of infrastructure interdependence

Assistant Professor Iris Tien, center, with WABE-FM's Jim Burress and Rose Scott after their conversation about Atlanta's infrastructure on the station's daily program Closer Look. (Photo Courtesy: WABE)

For a researcher who studies the ways society’s infrastructure systems are interconnected and interdependent, the Interstate 85 collapse this spring in Atlanta had a silver lining. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Iris Tien told Atlanta public radio station WABE that shutting down one of the city’s main thoroughfares presented a rare opportunity — despite the disruption to businesses and the extra travel time for residents.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

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