Smart Cities

Georgia Tech Hosts National Workshop on the Future of Smart City Digital Twin Technology

National leaders in smart city digital twin technology gathered at the Coda Building at Georgia Tech Sept. 16-17. Photo By: Amelia Neumeister

As communities look to improve service through technology, more and more are interested in an emerging field known as smart city digital twins—a concept that originated here at Georgia Tech. A Smart City Digital Twin is a virtual platform that utilizes data and internet-of-things technology to replicate and emulate changes happening in a real city’s infrastructure systems to provide insight that could help improve sustainability, resilience and livability.

Monday, September 23, 2019

New simulator puts people in a full-size car to understand their driving behavior

Ph.D. student Anye Zhou drives the new full-size simulator in Srinivas Peeta’s lab. The simulator is built from a 2013 Ford Focus and includes wraparound screens to immerse test drivers in the simulated environment. (Photo: Candler Hobbs)

When you take a seat in the 2013 Ford Fusion sitting in Srinivas Peeta’s new lab, you enter a virtual world where researchers can throw anything at you: snow and ice, detours, traffic snarls. All you have to do is drive — and in the process, help shape the future of transportation.

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Taylor, Watkins, Guin will help Columbus, Milton with smart communities projects

Angshuman Guin demonstrates how a cell phone tracks Gwinnett County Fire Department trucks and data about traffic to improve response times. Guin is working with Gwinnett on connected vehicle technology as part of the first round of Georgia Tech’s Georgia Smart Communities Challenge. (Photo: Allison Carter)

Georgia Tech’s Georgia Smart Communities Challenge named four new grants June 18 in Macon, including two led by School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers.

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Making the case for urban air mobility in Atlanta

Rendering of a two-story air-mobility hub with a landing area for four-rotor aircraft and a lower level for vehicle traffic. If the new Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility has its way, "vertiports" like this may soon be as popular as bus stops for city commuters and package transport. (Illustration: Yongmin Kim)

For those attending the Jan. 23 launch event for Georgia Tech’s Center for Urban and Regional Air Mobility, an efficient, safe, and speedy airborne alternative to ground gridlock is less than a decade away.

Friday, February 1, 2019

North Ave Smart Corridor wins mobility award at international Smart City Expo

Screenshot of North Avenue Smart Corridor: One Year Later video, with student riding a scooter on separated bike path and traffic in vehicle lanes.

The City of Atlanta’s North Avenue Smart Corridor Project was recognized as an innovative and transformative program during a leading international summit on smart cities.

Friday, November 16, 2018

Our autonomous transportation future: New Dickerson Chair Srinivas Peeta and the human-vehicle-infrastructure connections to make that future a reality

Srinivas Peeta, the new Frederick R. Dickerson Chair in the School of CIvil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo Luke Xinjing Xu)

The world of fully autonomous vehicles is inevitable, according to one of the newest faculty members in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The question is, how do we get there with the right policies and investments — and without so many bumps in the road that public trust erodes along the way.

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Guin helps lead connected vehicle master plan for Gwinnett, one of four inaugural Georgia Smart Communities

Georgia Smart Communities Challenge graphic with the state of Georgia and the four winning communities, Albany, Chamblee, Chatham County and Gwinnett County.

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researcher Angshuman Guin will lead research efforts in a new partnership with Gwinnett County announced June 12 to improve vehicle mobility and reduce crashes.

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Silence to sound: Looking at Twitter posts from 2017’s Hurricane Harvey shows lack of activity can tell first responders where trouble’s brewing

Floodwaters cover Port Arthur, Texas, on August 31, 2017, following Hurricane Harvey. Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez took this photo from a South Carolina Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during rescue operations following the storm. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez, U.S. Air National Guard)

With another hurricane season beginning June 1 — and some forecasters predicting another busy one — researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working on a tool to help first-responders use Twitter activity to identify developing crises after a storm while also helping civilians more effectively plug in to disaster response efforts.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

NSF awards graduate fellowship to Francisco for work helping people understand their energy use and act more sustainably

Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has received a National Science Foundation graduate fellowship. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

If we tell people how they’re using energy, can we encourage them to conserve and change their behavior? That question drives School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student Abby Francisco, who has just learned the National Science Foundation is supporting her work through a graduate research fellowship.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Coogan wins CAREER grant to build mathematical foundation for modeling and predicting traffic flow

Cars speed along the Interstate 75/Interstate 85 Downtown Connector in Atlanta. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Samuel Coogan says we have an unprecedented opportunity in the coming years to reshape how we operate our transportation systems. With the support of the National Science Foundation, he's going to take advantage.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

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