Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Researchers print objects that ‘remember’ their shape, allowing them to change dramatically when heated

Georgia Tech researchers Glaucio Paulino, left, and Jerry Qi hold 3-D printed objects that use tensegrity, a structural system of floating rods in compression and cables in continuous tension. They’ve developed a new way to create structures with “memory” that can expand dramatically when heated. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a way to use 3-D printers to create objects capable of expanding dramatically that could someday be used in applications ranging from space missions to biomedical devices.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Anwar wins poster competition with work on durability of connections between fiber-reinforced polymer materials

Ph.D. student Javaid Anwar with his first-place poster at the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering conference. (Photo: David Scott)

Ph.D. student Javaid Anwar returned from the Society for the Advancement of Material and Process Engineering conference this spring with the event’s best student poster.

Monday, June 12, 2017

LISTEN: I-85 collapse provides Tien a test case of infrastructure interdependence

Assistant Professor Iris Tien, center, with WABE-FM's Jim Burress and Rose Scott after their conversation about Atlanta's infrastructure on the station's daily program Closer Look. (Photo Courtesy: WABE)

For a researcher who studies the ways society’s infrastructure systems are interconnected and interdependent, the Interstate 85 collapse this spring in Atlanta had a silver lining. School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Iris Tien told Atlanta public radio station WABE that shutting down one of the city’s main thoroughfares presented a rare opportunity — despite the disruption to businesses and the extra travel time for residents.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

2017 Nevada Medal goes to newly minted PhD Sujith Mangalathu

Newly minted Ph.D. Sujith Mangalathu received more good news in the days after he officially graduated from Georgia Tech: he also has won the 2017 Nevada Medal for his research on bridge engineering.

Ph.D. student — and now graduate — Sujith Mangalathu has won the 2017 Nevada Medal for his work on bridge engineering.

Monday, May 15, 2017

Balancing military service, marriage, grad school: Two Army majors pick Tech to advance their careers

Marc and Kate Sanborn are working on doctorates in civil engineering with Lauren Stewart. The couple, married since 2012, are majors in the U.S. Army and need advanced degrees to continue their careers teaching at the U.S. Military Academy. (Photo: Missy Jurick)

Marc and Kate Sanborn are no strangers to building things. They built a marriage together. They built their Army careers to Majors together. And now they’re building upon their graduate degrees at Georgia Tech.

Friday, February 17, 2017

Change agent: Many resist change, but John Taylor has made a career studying it

John E. Taylor, the new Frederick L. Olmsted Profession in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

John E. Taylor joined the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the summer of 2016 as the inaugural Frederick L. Olmsted Professor. Taylor studies the dynamics where human and engineered networks meet, making him an ideal fit for an endowed professorship named for the father of landscape architecture and a designer who believed engineered infrastructure should be both functional and aesthetically appealing, serving society’s needs while also creating more livable and healthy communities.

Monday, December 12, 2016

New corrosion-resistant concrete reinforcement wins AASHTO Sweet 16 award for extending life of coastal bridges

A group of Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers after they received an AASHTO Sweet Sixteen award from DOT Commissioner Russell McMurry Dec. 8. Their work on corrosion-resistant concrete piles for marine environments has been used on bridges in Georgia and is being tested for use in nearby states.

A leading standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. The work developed a new steel to reinforce concrete bridge piles in marine environments that withstands corrosion and lasts well beyond the expected 100-year lifespan of the structures.

Friday, December 9, 2016

Dealing with uncertainty: New NSF project will create more accurate, faster interval-based approach to assessing structures for damage

Yang Wang and students in his research group install sensors on a bridge in Bartow County, Georgia, in July 2016. Wang, Francesco Fedele and Rafi Muhanna in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will use data from instruments like these to feed a new interval-based optimization approach to assess structural systems and detect damage. (Photo Courtesy: Yang Wang)

The National Science Foundation has funded a new collaboration between three School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers that could make finding damage in bridges or buildings easier and help reduce life-threatening failures. If successful, the team will be able to produce more reliable predictions about how structures behave, and their algorithm will be able to do the predictions much more quickly than current practice for structural damage and deterioration assessments.

Friday, November 4, 2016

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen meets with her TI:GER program group in October 2016 to talk about their project. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, is working on an idea with Assistant Professor Iris Tien they think will make a difference in improving America's crumbling infrastructure. It's work with so much potential that Johansen is working with other Georgia Tech and Emory University graduate students to commercialize her research.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

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