Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

New origami can morph from one pattern to another, unlocking possibilities for new structures and materials

A new type of origami can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics. (Photo: Allison Carter)

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a new type of origami that can morph from one pattern into a different one, or even a hybrid of two patterns, instantly altering many of its structural characteristics.

Friday, April 19, 2019

Johnston, Zhang produce two of Georgia Tech’s best Ph.D. dissertations this year

Former Ph.D. students Shelly Zhang and Eric Johnston, who have won the Sigma Xi Best Ph.D. Thesis award for 2019.

Sigma Xi has recognized the work of two recently graduated civil and environmental engineering doctoral students as some of the best of the year at Georgia Tech.

Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Jacobs’ nondestructive evaluation work earns lifetime achievement honor

Professor and Associate Dean Laurence Jacobs, left, accepts a lifetime achievement award in nondestructive evaluation from Tribikram Kundu at the SPIE Smart Structures and Nondestructive Evaluation Symposium in early March. (Photo Courtesy: Laurence Jacobs and SPIE)

An international organization dedicated to advancing light-based research and technology has given Laurence Jacobs a lifetime achievement award for his work on nondestructive evaluation.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Kurtis receives Concrete Institute’s Anderson Medal for excellence, creativity, leadership in concrete

Professor and Associate Dean Kimberly Kurtis (Photo: Christopher Moore)

Kimberly Kurtis didn’t know cement and concrete would become such an important part of her working life until she was a junior in college.

Friday, February 15, 2019

Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly

Silver dipoles are arranged across the folds of a Miuri-Ori pattern to create a radio frequency filter that’s tunable. By adjusting the dimensions, the filter can block a wide range of frequencies. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Yavari elected a fellow of the Society of Engineering Science, only the 2nd from Tech

Professor Arash Yavari, who has been elected a fellow of the Society of Engineering Science. (Photo: Amelia Neumeister)

Arash Yavari joins a fairly exclusive club in 2019, one that includes giants of science and engineering, National Academies members, and National Medal of Science winners.

Thursday, December 6, 2018

Origami, 3D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

Closeup of an origami structure created through Digital Light Processing 3D printing. (Photo: Christopher Moore)

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications in everything from biomedical devices to equipment used in space exploration. Until now, making such structures has involved multiple steps, more than one material, and assembly from smaller parts.

Monday, October 22, 2018

Stewart one of the ‘New Voices’ who will bring ideas, perspectives to National Academies

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in the Structural Engineering and Materials Lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has named Lauren Stewart to a new group of early career leaders who will help bring fresh ideas to the organizations.

Monday, October 1, 2018

Suryanarayana leads new $3M project to unlock the power of tomorrow’s supercomputers for understanding chemical phenomena

An illustration depicting chemical catalysis on surfaces and nanostructures. A new $2.8 million study led by School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Associate Professor Phanish Suryanarayana will harness the power of future supercomputers to understand the interactions that take place in these kinds of chemical reactions. (Image Courtesy: Andrew Medford)

Early in the next decade, the first computers capable of at least one quintillion calculations per second will come online at Argonne National Laboratory. Phanish Suryanarayana in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering is leading a team on a new project to make use of all those processors to study the interactions of atoms using quantum mechanics, building on computer code his team has developed in recent years. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the four-year, $2.8 million study — if everything goes well, as Suryanarayana puts it — will mean scientists can study and understand chemical systems that include up to 10 million atoms.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Shocking experiences keep Nylen going back for more

Ph.D. student and Sandia National Labs intern Rebecca Nylen kneels next to blasted steel cylinders, some of her handy work as a computational shock physicist. (Photo: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories)

If you didn’t know better, you’d think Rebecca Nylen had a terrible start to her summer internship.

Friday, September 7, 2018

Pages

Subscribe to Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials