Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

Origami, 3D printing merge to make complex structures in one shot

Closeup of an origami structure created through Digital Light Processing 3D printing. (Photo: Christopher Moore)

By merging the ancient art of origami with 21st century technology, researchers have created a one-step approach to fabricating complex origami structures whose light weight, expandability, and strength could have applications in everything from biomedical devices to equipment used in space exploration. Until now, making such structures has involved multiple steps, more than one material, and assembly from smaller parts.

Monday, October 22, 2018

Stewart one of the ‘New Voices’ who will bring ideas, perspectives to National Academies

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in the Structural Engineering and Materials Lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has named Lauren Stewart to a new group of early career leaders who will help bring fresh ideas to the organizations.

Monday, October 1, 2018

Suryanarayana leads new $3M project to unlock the power of tomorrow’s supercomputers for understanding chemical phenomena

An illustration depicting chemical catalysis on surfaces and nanostructures. A new $2.8 million study led by School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Associate Professor Phanish Suryanarayana will harness the power of future supercomputers to understand the interactions that take place in these kinds of chemical reactions. (Image Courtesy: Andrew Medford)

Early in the next decade, the first computers capable of at least one quintillion calculations per second will come online at Argonne National Laboratory. Phanish Suryanarayana in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering is leading a team on a new project to make use of all those processors to study the interactions of atoms using quantum mechanics, building on computer code his team has developed in recent years. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the four-year, $2.8 million study — if everything goes well, as Suryanarayana puts it — will mean scientists can study and understand chemical systems that include up to 10 million atoms.

Thursday, September 27, 2018

Shocking experiences keep Nylen going back for more

Ph.D. student and Sandia National Labs intern Rebecca Nylen kneels next to blasted steel cylinders, some of her handy work as a computational shock physicist. (Photo: Randy Montoya, Sandia National Laboratories)

If you didn’t know better, you’d think Rebecca Nylen had a terrible start to her summer internship.

Friday, September 7, 2018

Silence to sound: Looking at Twitter posts from 2017’s Hurricane Harvey shows lack of activity can tell first responders where trouble’s brewing

Floodwaters cover Port Arthur, Texas, on August 31, 2017, following Hurricane Harvey. Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez took this photo from a South Carolina Helicopter Aquatic Rescue Team UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter during rescue operations following the storm. (Photo: Staff Sgt. Daniel J. Martinez, U.S. Air National Guard)

With another hurricane season beginning June 1 — and some forecasters predicting another busy one — researchers in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering are working on a tool to help first-responders use Twitter activity to identify developing crises after a storm while also helping civilians more effectively plug in to disaster response efforts.

Thursday, May 24, 2018

Tech students win $140K from Siemens for machine learning, topology optimization project

Civil engineering students Yang Jiang, Emily Sanders and Heng Chi plus computation science and engineering student Yuyu Zhang with their first-place check after the Siemens FutureMakers Challlenge. Their concept for the hackathon at Georgia Tech combined machine learning and topology optimization to make computational design and digital manufacturing more efficient and effective. (Photo Courtesy: Glaucio Paulino)

Four Georgia Tech students will receive $140,000 from Siemens to turn a hackathon idea into reality after winning the company’s FutureMakers Challenge May 5.

Tuesday, May 8, 2018

ASCE picks Saini for Ammann Research Fellowship

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini, one of the American Society of Civil Engineers' O.H. Ammann Research Fellows in Structural Engineering for this year. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Ph.D. student Ajay Saini has earned the support of the American Society of Civil Engineers for his work on structural reliability and resilience.

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Yavari’s new project will lay a mathematical foundation for cloaking structures

Professor Arash Yavari stands in front of his packed bookcase in his Mason Building office. Yavari has embarked upon a four-year research project to lay the mathematical foundations for cloaking structures from earthquakes and other stress waves. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Can you hide a building from a stress wave, like an earthquake or even some kind of blast or explosion? If that kind of “cloaking” were possible, it could shape how we design critical structures like nuclear power plants. Arash Yavari has started a new four-year, half-million dollar federally funded project to lay the mathematical foundations for that kind of technology and explore if it’s theoretically possible while still respecting the laws of physics.

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Goodno publishes new hybrid statics and mechanics textbook

Part of the cover of Barry Goodno's new textbook, "Statics and Mechanics of Materials," co-written with James Gere. The new text offers a coordinated approach to both foundational courses in mechanics, according to Goodno. (Image Courtesy: Cengage and Barry Goodno)

The first edition of Barry Goodno’s new textbook, Statics and Mechanics of Materials, arrived in stores and online retailers in October.

Wednesday, October 25, 2017

Tien, Johansen win Resilience Week top award for paper on vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure

Chloe Johansen, left, and Iris Tien hold their first-place paper award at the Resilience Week 2017 conference for their work analyzing the vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure. They used Atlanta's water and power systems as a case study. (Photo Courtesy: Iris Tien)

Iris Tien and Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen won a top award at the Resilience Week 2017 conference for their paper on analyzing the vulnerabilities of interdependent infrastructure.

Thursday, October 19, 2017

Pages

Subscribe to Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials