Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

Failing infrastructure: We can’t fix it all, so Chloe Johansen’s research will help us prioritize

Ph.D. student Chloe Johansen meets with her TI:GER program group in October 2016 to talk about their project. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Chloe Johansen, a School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, is working on an idea with Assistant Professor Iris Tien they think will make a difference in improving America's crumbling infrastructure. It's work with so much potential that Johansen is working with other Georgia Tech and Emory University graduate students to commercialize her research.

Thursday, October 20, 2016

Hurricanes vs. Stadiums: Stewart explains why the massive structures can withstand storms

SEC Country website screen shot of a story looking at the effects of major hurricanes on college football stadiums.

With Hurricane Matthew looming, college football programs throughout the Southeast had to consider the impact of the massive storm on their scheduled games Oct. 8. Two games has to be postponed — one indefinitely — prompting the Atlanta Journal-Constitution’s SEC Country website to ask what would happen to a stadium in a major hurricane.

Monday, October 10, 2016

Tien: What we build builds communities

A neighborhood on the Westside of Atlanta, an example of the premise that has been stuck in Iris Tien's mind recently: how the infrastructure civil and environmental engineers build — or the lack thereof in areas like this — influences the surrounding community. (Photo: Iris Tien)

In a blog post for the Georgia Tech Center for Serve-Learn-Sustain, Iris Tien lays out the importance of civil infrastructure in building communities.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

A Booming Career

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in her lab.

Walking toward Lauren Stewart’s office, you immediately smell the odor of glue in the air. A quick glance around reveals model bridges in various states of completion lying about a student work area as harried undergraduates work to finish class assignments. Stewart, an assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, teaches a beginning structures course, so this is a recurrent theme each semester. Stewart herself, however, is more at home with the smell of explosives and destruction rather than construction.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Air Force selects Stewart for summer faculty fellowship program

Lauren Stewart in her lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Lauren Stewart will spend some of her summer at Eglin Air Force Base in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida, working to better understand how military components react when they strike a “hardened target.” Stewart has received a summer faculty fellowship from the Air Force Research Lab.

Friday, March 25, 2016

Paulino’s origami research wins award for scientific excellence, originality

Glaucio Paulino and Evgueni Filipov with models of their zippered tube origami configuration. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A paper detailing a type of origami tube that is strong and reconfigurable will be recognized in May as one of the best studies published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in 2015. The editors of the journal have selected the research for the Cozzarelli Prize, an annual award for scientific excellence and originality.

Wednesday, February 24, 2016

San Francisco Chronicle: Kahn explains corrosion in Bay Bridge tunnel

Screen shot of SFGate.com tunnel corrosion story featuring Professor Emeritus Larry Kahn.

A chunk of concrete dropped off a wall into traffic Jan. 30 in the Yerba Buena Island tunnel that’s part of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge. Now the California Department of Transportation is investigating whether there’s more corrosion in the tunnel that could lead to other problems.

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

‘Reprogramming’ structures: Paulino’s team creates another new origami design that can be reconfigured for multiple uses

Origami, the ancient art of paper folding, may soon provide a foundation for antennas that can reconfigure themselves to operate at different frequencies, microfluidic devices whose properties can change in operation – and even heating and air-conditioning ductwork that adjusts to demand. The applications could result from reconfigurable and reprogrammable origami tubes developed by researchers at three institutions, including the Georgia Institute of Technology. By changing the ways in which the paper is folded, the same tube can have six or more different cross sections.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Arson, Suryanarayana win sought-after CAREER awards from NSF

Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana, winners of CAREER awards from the NSF.

Two assistant professors in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have won one of the nation’s premiere grants and the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for junior faculty, the Early Career Development award. Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana learned of their selection in early January for what are known simply as CAREER awards. The grants recognize the top educators and researchers in the country, those who “exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research,” according to the NSF.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Cardelino wins ACI’s Kuhlman Scholarship

The American Concrete Institute Georgia Chapter has selected Ph.D. candidate Natalia Cardelino to receive this year’s Robert H. Kuhlman Student Scholarship. Cardelino will receive the award a banquet in February. She’s in her second year of doctoral studies in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, where she is examining ways to improve the sustainability of concrete.

Friday, January 15, 2016

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