Structural Engineering, Mechanics, and Materials

Arson, Suryanarayana win sought-after CAREER awards from NSF

Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana, winners of CAREER awards from the NSF.

Two assistant professors in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering have won one of the nation’s premiere grants and the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for junior faculty, the Early Career Development award. Chloe Arson and Phanish Suryanarayana learned of their selection in early January for what are known simply as CAREER awards. The grants recognize the top educators and researchers in the country, those who “exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research,” according to the NSF.

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Cardelino wins ACI’s Kuhlman Scholarship

The American Concrete Institute Georgia Chapter has selected Ph.D. candidate Natalia Cardelino to receive this year’s Robert H. Kuhlman Student Scholarship. Cardelino will receive the award a banquet in February. She’s in her second year of doctoral studies in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, where she is examining ways to improve the sustainability of concrete.

Friday, January 15, 2016

Toward ‘greener’ concrete: Kurtis article in MRS Bulletin focuses on innovations in producing the ubiquitous material

Cover of MRS Bulletin December 2015 special issue

Kimberly Kurtis surveys innovations in cement-based materials and efforts to improve the sustainability of concrete in a new article published in a December 2015 special issue of MRS Bulletin. The issue celebrates 40 years of the journal from the Materials Research Society. Editors invited Kurtis’ to explore recent developments in the design of concrete as part of the issue’s focus on the interplay between materials and engineering and how that relationship is driving innovations in materials.

Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Kim’s work on detecting carbonation in concrete named one of Materials and Structures top papers of 2015

The board of editors of the journal Materials and Structures has picked an article by Ph.D. student Gun Kim as one of its outstanding papers of 2015. The research, which demonstrated a new noninvasive way to measure the carbonation of concrete, will now be available online for free as a result. In a letter to one of Kim’s advisers, Laurence Jacobs, Jason Weiss from Materials and Structures said only 10 papers earn the distinction each year.

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Tien wins NSF funding to improve reliability of our interdependent infrastructure

The National Science Foundation has awarded Iris Tien $499,920 for a three-year project that will develop new computer models of infrastructure systems and the connections between them. The idea is to create a model that can be used for any infrastructure system — water, power, transportation, or communications, for example — and takes into account each component of the system as well as how the system interacts with other infrastructure.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Researchers develop new 'zippered' origami tubes that fold flat, deploy easily, and still hold considerable weight

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Georgia Institute of Technology and the University of Tokyo have developed a new “zippered tube” configuration that makes paper structures stiff enough to hold weight yet able to fold flat for easy shipping and storage. Their method could be applied to other thin materials, such as plastic or metal, to transform structures ranging from furniture and buildings to microscopic robots.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

10 years after Katrina, are American cities prepared for disasters?

Ahead of a Washington D.C. roundtable August 5 on disaster preparedness, Reginald DesRoches and Wayne Clough talked to the Georgia Tech News Center about the challenges for many of the country's communities. The conversation comes just a few weeks before the 10-year anniversary of the hurricane that devastated New Orleans and ravaged the Gulf Coast.

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Concrete that can clean itself or purify the air? Christian Science Monitor story highlights Kurtis’ research

In a story July 24 about advances in concrete technology, the Christian Science Monitor talked to the School's Kim Kurtis about her work with titanium dioxide in the ubiquitous material used for roads, bridges and buildings.

Monday, July 27, 2015

PhD student Bradley Dolphyn studying the concrete cracks that shut down Crystal River nuclear power plant

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering doctoral student Bradley Dolphyn is working to figure out just what happened to the massive concrete containment building at the Crystal River 3 nuclear power plant in Florida. Cracks in the building ultimately led its owner, Duke Energy, to shut down the facility.

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

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