Transportation Systems Engineering

Coogan wins CAREER grant to build mathematical foundation for modeling and predicting traffic flow

Cars speed along the Interstate 75/Interstate 85 Downtown Connector in Atlanta. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Samuel Coogan says we have an unprecedented opportunity in the coming years to reshape how we operate our transportation systems. With the support of the National Science Foundation, he's going to take advantage.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Watkins extols virtues of parks as transportation infrastructure in 'Governing' op-ed

Screeen capture of Governing op-ed by Kari Watkins and Cathering Nagel, "Urban Parks' Emerging Role as Transportation Infrastructure"

Parks — especially linear parks — are emerging as viable and popular transportation corridors in cities around the country and connecting once-divided neighborhoods, according to a commentary published by Governing magazine Nov. 28.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

National group honors research using lasers and AI to automatically assess health of highway pavement and catalog road signs

Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers have earned an award for their work to automatically detect cracks, ruts and other pavement issues on the state's highways. Their system uses lasers and artificial intelligence to also detect and catalog roadside signs. This image shows an automatically detected pavement rut modeled in 3-D. (Image: James Tsai)

A leading, standards-setting transportation organization has named a project by Georgia Tech and Georgia Department of Transportation researchers one of the year’s most valuable. And the work could save time and money for DOTs around the country.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

‘Mass Transit’ features vehicle-dispatching research that fixed ‘bunching’ for Atlanta Streetcar, Tech’s Stinger

"Mass Transit" Expo Daily edition for Oct. 9, 2017, featuring article by Simon Berrebi about his research with Kari Watkins and Jorge Laval on bus bunching.

Alumnus Simon Berrebi wrote about his efforts to fix “bus bunching” for a daily edition of Mass Transit magazine produced for the American Public Transportation Association Annual Meeting and EXPO that began Oct. 8.

Monday, October 9, 2017

On WABE, Hunter lays out challenges and research questions that will help define the autonomous-vehicle future

Associate Professor Michael Hunter explains his work with the North Avenue Smart Corridor at the ribbon-cutting event for the roadway. Hunter appeared on WABE-FM's Closer Look Sept. 26 to talk about his work on autonomous vehicles, one of the technologies that will be tested along North Avenue. (Photo Courtesy: Georgia Tech Institute for People and Technology)

On the roadway toward autonomous vehicles, we probably have another decade or so before the truly independent car is part of our transportation network. But, Michael Hunter told WABE-FM’s Closer Look Sept. 26, we’re already in a world with partially driverless cars, where our vehicles help us with some of the tasks of driving.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Energy, emissions and a smarter North Ave: Hunter, Guensler crunch data from new smart corridor to improve traffic, safety

Associate Professor Michael Hunter stands along North Avenue, the City of Atlanta's new "smart corridor." Along with the city, the Georgia Department of Transportation and other partners, Hunter will help cut the ribbon for the corridor Sept. 14. (Photo: Chris Moore)

The City of Atlanta will officially cut the ribbon on the North Avenue “smart corridor” Sept. 14, unveiling what city officials call the most-connected corridor in the state and a living laboratory for traffic management. It’s a partnership between the city, Georgia Department of Transportation, Georgia Tech and others.

Wednesday, September 13, 2017

New faculty member Sam Coogan connects civil and electrical engineering to run the transportation systems of tomorrow

Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

A new faculty member with one foot in electrical engineering and another in civil engineering is working to make sure the transportation systems of the future can accommodate all the different demands they will face, from self-driving cars to technologies we haven’t even imagined yet. Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Smart Cities: Innovative approaches combining engineering, technology and the social sciences are boosting the urban IQ

Smart Cities graphic with a rendering of the city of Atlanta.

Georgia Tech has been intensifying its smart cities initiative, including membership in the national MetroLab Network and the launch of a new faculty council with members from more than a dozen university units. Tech has long been working in the, but the now the Institute is organizing all the research that’s happening to have a bigger impact.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Transportation Research Board invites Mokhtarian to deliver 2018 Deen Distinguished Lecture

Patricia Mokhtarian, the Susan G. and Christopher D. Pappas Professor. She has been invited to deliver the Deen Distinguished Lecture at the 2018 Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting.

Patricia Mokhtarian will deliver the signature presentation at the 2018 Transportation Research Board meeting in January, the Thomas B. Deen Distinguished Lecture.

Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Which bicycle infrastructure makes riders safer? Turns out, we don’t yet know

A bicyclist rides in a marked bike lane alongside a multi-lane road in Lutz, Florida. A new study of bicycle infrastructure from a team of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers has found we don’t know much yet about how well bicycle infrastructure like these lanes protect riders. (Photo Courtesy: Daniel Oines via Flickr.)

Shared lane markings. Bike lanes painted a bright color. Bike boxes at intersections. Cycle tracks that provide physical barriers between bikes and cars. Communities have built these and other flavors of infrastructure to try to make it safer for people to ride their bikes along roadways or through neighborhoods. But which ones work best?

Friday, June 9, 2017

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