Water Resources Engineering

Muscalus Named Georgia Tech's Graduate Instructor of the Year

A woman holds a large check in front of a building

On April 20, Georgia Tech announced its winners for the 2022 TA and Future Faculty Awards Day, including CEE Ph.D. student Alex Muscalus.  

Thursday, April 21, 2022

The Flow of Innovation

Georgia Tech’s Hydraulics Lab studies environmental fluid dynamics across various STEM disciplines

Thursday, February 3, 2022

Research On Large Storm Waves Could Help Lessen Their Impact On Coasts

When cyclones or other massive oceanic storms make landfall, their giant waves batter coastlines and sometimes cause widespread damage. Now, an international team of researchers has analyzed months of data of large nearshore waves to provide new insights that could help improve the designs of a variety of coastal structures from seaports to seawalls to better withstand destructive waves.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Environmental Engineering Team Places 2nd in International Design Competition

Three Georgia Tech students stand by the podium at the Water Environment Federation's student design competition

A team from Georgia Tech took the No. 2 spot at the Water Environment Federation’s international student design competition. The team, comprised of spring 2019 environmental engineering graduates, earned second place with their entry—the first time a team from Georgia Tech has ever entered the competition.  

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Afolabi Awarded Sloan Scholarship

Moyosore Afolabi has been selected to receive a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. program.

Moyosore Afolabi has been selected to receive a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. program. Afolabi is a Ph.D. student in Environmental Engineering and an NSF graduate research fellow whose research focuses on the development of novel membrane filters for the removal of emerging contaminants from wastewater. 

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

How Amateur Video is Helping Us Understand Deadly Tsunamis

Hermann Fritz heard the news on the radio. It was the day after Christmas in 2004, and Fritz, a civil engineer who lived in Georgia, was visiting his parents' home in Zurich, Switzerland, for the holidays. The reporter's voice crackled through the speaker: There had been an earthquake in the Indian Ocean. A tsunami had followed. Thousands of people were presumed dead. Fritz, then 32, was shocked by the human toll. But he also listened with professional interest. He'd recently been hired as a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Savannah, where he studied tsunamis. How Amateur Video Is Helping Us Understand Deadly Tsunamis​

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

NSF natural hazards group highlights Fritz’s unique volcanic landslide generator

The volcanic tsunami generator simulates a volcanic eruption by “punching” through the water’s surface. Professor Hermann Fritz built this one-of-a-kind setup and conducted a series of experiments to better understand tsunamis created by eruptions of underwater volcanoes. (Photo: Yibin Liu)

Last summer, Hermann Fritz was watching a miniature volcano erupt over and over again. The idea was to generate tsunamis from the eruption or a resulting landslide to see how these rare events differ from their more common earthquake-generated cousins.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

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