Water Resources Engineering

Did a rogue wave help sink the El Faro? Fedele’s analysis supports NTSB investigation of ship lost in 2015 hurricane

The stern of the El Faro is shown on the ocean floor where it came to rest after sinking in Hurricane Joaquin in 2015. (Photo Courtesy: National Transportation Safety Board)

A new analysis done to support the investigation into the 2015 sinking of the El Faro cargo ship has calculated the likelihood of a massive rogue wave during Hurricane Joaquin in October of that year — and demonstrated a new technique for evaluating the probability of rogue waves over space and time.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

NASA fellowship supports Di Vittorio’s work using satellites to improve water management

Courtney Di Vittorio, left, with her Ph.D. adviser, Aris Georgakakos and some of the data she's using for her research. Di Vittorio's work to incorporate satellite data into hydrologic models so decision-makers can improve water management plans has won her a 2017 Earth and Space Science Fellowship from NASA. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Ph.D. student Courtney Di Vittorio has won support from NASA for her work using satellite data to better manage water resources. The fourth-year civil engineering grad student learned this month she is one of the space agency’s 2017 Earth and Space Science Fellows.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Sturm elected an ASCE fellow

Professor Terry Sturm, who has been elected a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

Renowned hydraulic engineer Terry Sturm has been named a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a prestigious honor afforded less than 3.5 percent of the society’s members.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

Liquid Assets: Tech researchers are working to solve the world’s water problems

Water drop

From the drinking-water contamination in Flint, Mich., to the seemingly endless drought in California, good old H2O pools at the heart of many of today’s most pressing and headline-grabbing problems. Find out how the work and ideas of Tech researchers are helping us understand — and solve — these planet-wide challenges.

Monday, January 9, 2017

Georgia Tech launches Ph.D. in ocean science and engineering

Ocean Science and Engineering webpage screenshot

Georgia Tech now offers an interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in Ocean Science and Engineering. The new program aims to train ocean scientists and engineers by combining basic and applied sciences with innovative ocean technologies.

Thursday, October 27, 2016

Water Resources Research editors say Bras’ work some of the year’s most significant

A study by Rafael L. Bras advancing the modeling of river watershed evolution in semi-arid areas has been named an Editor’s Choice by the journal Water Resources Research.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Understanding landslide-generated tsunamis — and predicting their impact

A simulated landslide splashes into a wave basin at Oregon State University.

Scientists better understand the formation of rare but deadly kinds of tsunamis as a result of first-of-their-kind experiments by two Georgia Tech researchers.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Understanding rogue ocean waves may be simple after all

A large wave towers astern of the NOAA ship Delaware II in the Atlantic Ocean in 2005. (Photo: Delaware II Crew/NOAA)

An international team of scientists has developed a relatively simple mathematical explanation for the rogue ocean waves that can develop seemingly out of nowhere to sink ships and overwhelm oil platforms with walls of water as much as 25 meters high.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Sigma Xi names Bruder’s dissertation on tidal energy one of the best of the year

Brittany Bruder, Ph.D. 2015

Brittany Bruder’s work assessing tidal energy around a small island in coastal Georgia has won Sigma Xi’s award for the best Ph.D. dissertations this year at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

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