Water Resources Engineering

Research On Large Storm Waves Could Help Lessen Their Impact On Coasts

When cyclones or other massive oceanic storms make landfall, their giant waves batter coastlines and sometimes cause widespread damage. Now, an international team of researchers has analyzed months of data of large nearshore waves to provide new insights that could help improve the designs of a variety of coastal structures from seaports to seawalls to better withstand destructive waves.

Monday, November 4, 2019

Environmental Engineering Team Places 2nd in International Design Competition

Three Georgia Tech students stand by the podium at the Water Environment Federation's student design competition

A team from Georgia Tech took the No. 2 spot at the Water Environment Federation’s international student design competition. The team, comprised of spring 2019 environmental engineering graduates, earned second place with their entry—the first time a team from Georgia Tech has ever entered the competition.  

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Afolabi Awarded Sloan Scholarship

Moyosore Afolabi has been selected to receive a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. program.

Moyosore Afolabi has been selected to receive a scholarship from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Minority Ph.D. program. Afolabi is a Ph.D. student in Environmental Engineering and an NSF graduate research fellow whose research focuses on the development of novel membrane filters for the removal of emerging contaminants from wastewater. 

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

How Amateur Video is Helping Us Understand Deadly Tsunamis

Hermann Fritz heard the news on the radio. It was the day after Christmas in 2004, and Fritz, a civil engineer who lived in Georgia, was visiting his parents' home in Zurich, Switzerland, for the holidays. The reporter's voice crackled through the speaker: There had been an earthquake in the Indian Ocean. A tsunami had followed. Thousands of people were presumed dead. Fritz, then 32, was shocked by the human toll. But he also listened with professional interest. He'd recently been hired as a professor at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Savannah, where he studied tsunamis. How Amateur Video Is Helping Us Understand Deadly Tsunamis​

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

NSF natural hazards group highlights Fritz’s unique volcanic landslide generator

The volcanic tsunami generator simulates a volcanic eruption by “punching” through the water’s surface. Professor Hermann Fritz built this one-of-a-kind setup and conducted a series of experiments to better understand tsunamis created by eruptions of underwater volcanoes. (Photo: Yibin Liu)

Last summer, Hermann Fritz was watching a miniature volcano erupt over and over again. The idea was to generate tsunamis from the eruption or a resulting landslide to see how these rare events differ from their more common earthquake-generated cousins.

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Fritz, colleagues find surprising clue to severity of Indonesia tsunami

Screenshot of BBC News story about new data collected by Hermann Fritz and his colleagues after the tsunami in Indonesia in September.

Scientists have puzzled over the size of the tsunami that washed ashore in Palu, Indonesia, since it devastated the community in September. Now researchers report they may have a new clue.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

Remembering Professor Emeritus Sam Martin

Professor Emeritus Samuel Martin, who died Nov. 14. Faculty members and colleagues remembered Martin as a dedicated mentor, colleague and friend.

Mentor. Friend. Those words kept coming up as School of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty members remembered Professor Emeritus Samuel Martin, who died Nov. 14. He was 82.

Monday, December 3, 2018

LISTEN: Studying volcano eruptions deep underwater with Hermann Fritz

Hermann Fritz helping install the Volcanic Tsunami Generator at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University earlier this summer. (Photo: Angela Del Rosario / Courtesy: Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure)

Professor Hermann Fritz has spent the summer traveling between Atlanta and Corvallis, Oregon, building a new one-of-a-kind tool for his landslide research.

Friday, August 17, 2018

Eyewitness accounts fill in details of 1946 Dominican Republic tsunami

Claudio Martinez from the Dominican Republic’s Oficina Nacional de Meteorologia in Matancitas with local resident Patria, right, who took Martinez and Georgia Tech’s Hermann Fritz back to the site of a 1946 tsunami in the area. Patria remembered how high waters had reached at this palm tree, helping the team reconstruct the tsunami’s impacts more than seven decades after it happened. (Photo Courtesy: Hermann Fritz)

Almost 70 years later, the man remembered the August day in Playa Rincon, when he clung to the top of an almond tree to survive a tsunami where the waters rushed about 700 meters inland after a magnitude 8.1 earthquake.

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

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