Water Resources Engineering

Understanding rogue ocean waves may be simple after all

A large wave towers astern of the NOAA ship Delaware II in the Atlantic Ocean in 2005. (Photo: Delaware II Crew/NOAA)

An international team of scientists has developed a relatively simple mathematical explanation for the rogue ocean waves that can develop seemingly out of nowhere to sink ships and overwhelm oil platforms with walls of water as much as 25 meters high.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

New model explains how soil erosion affects the amount of carbon in Earth’s atmosphere

Yannis Dialynas, a hydrology Ph.D. student in Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Georgia Tech Provost Rafael L. Bras, discuss a model of soil erosion. This research is studying the role of erosion on carbon cycling. (Photo: Rob Felt)

A high-resolution model of how soil erosion impacts the carbon cycle of a small South Carolina watershed may help explain an apparent imbalance in the world’s carbon budget. Explaining that apparent imbalance is necessary for understanding and predicting the course of global climate change.

Thursday, June 9, 2016

Sigma Xi names Bruder’s dissertation on tidal energy one of the best of the year

Brittany Bruder, Ph.D. 2015

Brittany Bruder’s work assessing tidal energy around a small island in coastal Georgia has won Sigma Xi’s award for the best Ph.D. dissertations this year at Georgia Tech.

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

‘Flying’ through the ocean: Researchers find the sea butterfly swims like insects fly

A sea butterfly (Limacina helicina). Photo: EOL Learning and Education Group via Flickr.

It turns out that the sea butterfly (Limacina helicina), a zooplankton snail that lives in cold oceans, lives up to its name. Georgia Institute of Technology researchers went to the Pacific Ocean to scoop up hundreds of the 3-millimeter marine mollusks (called pteropods), and then used high-speed cameras to watch how they move. They found that sea butterflies don’t paddle like most small water animals. Instead, they’re like flying insects, flapping their wings to produce lift and propel them through the water.

Thursday, February 18, 2016

Sturm, Hong win 2016 Hilgard Prize for their paper on predicting scour around bridges during floods

Seung Ho Hong in the Donovan Hydraulics Laboratory with the flume used in his study.

Professor Terry Sturm and former Ph.D. student Seung Ho Hong have received a top research award for hydraulic engineering from the American Society of Civil Engineers. Sturm and Hong won for a study on predicting the amount of erosion, or scour, around bridge supports during floods.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Georgakakos to CBS46: Plenty of water for Alabama, Florida and Georgia 85% of the time

Professor Aris Georgakakos explains his models of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system to CBS46's Sally Sears.

Georgakakos explains his work modeling water flows in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system to CBS46’s Sally Sears. Georgakakos said there’s plenty of water flowing down the Chattahoochee River 85 percent of the time.

Friday, December 11, 2015

Fritz leads survey team to examine dam breaks after South Carolina flooding

A team of scientists led by the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering’s Hermann Fritz has just returned from a four-day reconnaissance mission in South Carolina assessing damage after record-breaking rainfall flooded large swaths of the state. They found several of the dams they inspected failed before they were overtopped by water.

Friday, October 16, 2015

Tech researchers’ work leads to long-awaited water plan for Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin

A grassroots group of stakeholders in the three-state battle over water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint rivers released a consensus water management plan for the basin May 13, thanks in good measure to work by Professor Aris Georgakakos and his team.

Friday, May 15, 2015

What we've learned, 10 years after the Indian Ocean tsunami that killed 250,000 people

The day after Christmas in 2004, a massive earthquake shook the ocean floor, sending a tsunami rippling through the Indian Ocean. When that surge reached the shore — from Thailand to Africa — it left more than 250,000 people missing or dead in 12 countries. Millions more lost their homes. Hermann Fritz, a renowned tsunami expert, did extensive research after the disaster, and he recently talked about the event a decade later.

Friday, December 19, 2014

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