Water

InVenture team creates a simple system to keep household water clean in developing countries

Samantha Becker, left, and Shannon Evanchec film a segment about their water purification system ahead of the live-televised finals of the InVenture Prize. Their team, TruePani, will compete with five other finalists for $20,000, a free patent filing, and a place in a Georgia Tech startup incubator at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. (Photo: TruePani)

For something like 900 million people in India, access to clean water isn’t the problem. It’s keeping that water clean once it reaches households. A team of civil and environmental engineering and business administration students have invented a system to fight bacterial growth. They compete for the InVenture Prize March 16.

Monday, March 14, 2016

‘30 Second Thesis’ series shows how grad students are changing the world

Aaron Bivins explains his Ph.D. research as part of the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering's new video series, "30 Second Thesis."

The School of Civil and Environmental Engineering debuts a new video concept March 3 highlighting the work of our graduate students. This occasional series challenges students from every discipline within civil and environmental engineering to explain their research and why it matters in 30 seconds (or close to that).

Thursday, March 3, 2016

Georgakakos to CBS46: Plenty of water for Alabama, Florida and Georgia 85% of the time

Professor Aris Georgakakos explains his models of the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system to CBS46's Sally Sears.

Georgakakos explains his work modeling water flows in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river system to CBS46’s Sally Sears. Georgakakos said there’s plenty of water flowing down the Chattahoochee River 85 percent of the time.

Friday, December 11, 2015

‘Engineering found me’: Undergrad Rebecca Yoo and her passion for helping people in the developing world

Rebecca Yoo knew long before she arrived at the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering that she was interested in international development, but having been born into a family of liberal arts majors, she wasn’t sure how engineering could play a role. After hearing more about civil engineering at a seminar for undecided engineers, however, she knew she’d found her niche.

Thursday, October 29, 2015

NSF funds $12M research network to build the healthy, sustainable, livable cities of the future

How will we build the cities of the future in a sustainable way? A new National Science Foundation-funded research network will connect scientists at nine universities with infrastructure groups, public policy experts, and industry partners to reimagine cities. Georgia Tech will be an anchor of the $12 million network, which will be led by the University of Minnesota, and School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Ted Russell will serve as a co-director.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Huang’s Gwinnett County water reuse project could be a ‘game changer’ for water utilities

A metro Atlanta county is joining with School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers and engineering firm CDM Smith on a water reuse project that could be a model for other communities around the country.

Friday, August 7, 2015

Crittenden wins Clarke Prize for contributions to water sustainability and water treatment technology

One of the world’s most prestigious honors will go to School of Civil and Environmental Engineering professor John Crittenden this fall. The National Water Research Institute named Crittenden the winner of the 2015 Clarke Prize July 20, citing his contributions to the sustainability of urban water resources.

Monday, July 20, 2015

Tech researchers’ work leads to long-awaited water plan for Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint river basin

A grassroots group of stakeholders in the three-state battle over water from the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint rivers released a consensus water management plan for the basin May 13, thanks in good measure to work by Professor Aris Georgakakos and his team.

Friday, May 15, 2015

In their own words: A research trip to Bolivia changes travelers’ perspectives

A dozen School of Civil and Environmental Engineering students spent their Spring Break working in La Paz, Bolivia, and nearby rural communities. Traipsing around with strange apparatuses hanging around their necks or dipping graduated cylinders into lakes and under water spigots. Connecting their years of classroom study to the real world.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Spending Spring Break among the alpacas

While many students left campus last Friday for a well-deserved break from classes, one group boarded a plane for South America, where they’ll spend the week applying their research in remote communities in Bolivia.

Monday, March 16, 2015

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