Transportation

Alumna’s work making Jacksonville more bike-friendly earns statewide honor from Florida Bicycle Association

Amy Ingles, the Florida Bicycle Association's Professional of the Year for 2017. Ingles earned bachelor's and master's degrees in civil engineering at Georgia Tech. (Photo Courtesy: Amy Ingles)

Apparently bicycle advocates across Florida have taken notice of Jacksonville's new bicycle master plan: They recently honored the civil and environmental engineering graduate who helped develop it as the state’s bicycle professional of the year for 2017.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Capstone Expo winners create a simple solution that saves drivers tons of time at I-20 and I-285 in west Atlanta

Atlanta Cypress Engineering won the civil and environmental engineering award at the spring 2018 Capstone Design Expo. The team poses with the winning check. From right: Blane Solomon, Andrew Pofahl, Buzz, Alex Hare, and Ramiro Santana along with senior design professor John Koon. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

A simple design change with the potential of saving Atlanta drivers a combined year’s worth of travel time every day took home the civil and environmental engineering top prize at the Georgia Tech Capstone Design Expo April 24.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Ederer invited to DC for inside look at transportation policymaking as Eno fellow

Ph.D. student David Ederer, who has been selected for the 2018 class of the Eno Center for Transportation Future Leaders Development Conference.

Ph.D. student David Ederer will experience a week-long immersion in transportation policymaking this spring at the Eno Center for Transportation Future Leaders Development Conference.

Tuesday, April 3, 2018

Coogan wins CAREER grant to build mathematical foundation for modeling and predicting traffic flow

Cars speed along the Interstate 75/Interstate 85 Downtown Connector in Atlanta. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Samuel Coogan says we have an unprecedented opportunity in the coming years to reshape how we operate our transportation systems. With the support of the National Science Foundation, he's going to take advantage.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Watkins extols virtues of parks as transportation infrastructure in 'Governing' op-ed

Screeen capture of Governing op-ed by Kari Watkins and Cathering Nagel, "Urban Parks' Emerging Role as Transportation Infrastructure"

Parks — especially linear parks — are emerging as viable and popular transportation corridors in cities around the country and connecting once-divided neighborhoods, according to a commentary published by Governing magazine Nov. 28.

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

On WABE, Hunter lays out challenges and research questions that will help define the autonomous-vehicle future

Associate Professor Michael Hunter explains his work with the North Avenue Smart Corridor at the ribbon-cutting event for the roadway. Hunter appeared on WABE-FM's Closer Look Sept. 26 to talk about his work on autonomous vehicles, one of the technologies that will be tested along North Avenue. (Photo Courtesy: Georgia Tech Institute for People and Technology)

On the roadway toward autonomous vehicles, we probably have another decade or so before the truly independent car is part of our transportation network. But, Michael Hunter told WABE-FM’s Closer Look Sept. 26, we’re already in a world with partially driverless cars, where our vehicles help us with some of the tasks of driving.

Wednesday, September 27, 2017

ARCS awards go to 4 grad students

Calvin Clark, Xenia Wirth, Osvaldo Broesicke and Anna Skipper, who have each earned a scholarship from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation for 2017.

Osvaldo Broesicke, Calvin Clark, Anna Skipper and Xenia Wirth have each earned more funding from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation to support their studies and open up opportunities to advance their research.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

WABE asks Watkins, do those neighborhood ‘slow down’ signs work?

WABE webpage for story featuring Kari Watkins, 'Do the "slow down" signs around Atlanta work?'

Atlanta NPR member station WABE used the unusual example of a Looney Tunes character dangling a “go slow” sign to illustrate what many neighborhoods in the city are doing: installing signs to encourage drivers to check their speed.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

New faculty member Sam Coogan connects civil and electrical engineering to run the transportation systems of tomorrow

Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

A new faculty member with one foot in electrical engineering and another in civil engineering is working to make sure the transportation systems of the future can accommodate all the different demands they will face, from self-driving cars to technologies we haven’t even imagined yet. Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Which bicycle infrastructure makes riders safer? Turns out, we don’t yet know

A bicyclist rides in a marked bike lane alongside a multi-lane road in Lutz, Florida. A new study of bicycle infrastructure from a team of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers has found we don’t know much yet about how well bicycle infrastructure like these lanes protect riders. (Photo Courtesy: Daniel Oines via Flickr.)

Shared lane markings. Bike lanes painted a bright color. Bike boxes at intersections. Cycle tracks that provide physical barriers between bikes and cars. Communities have built these and other flavors of infrastructure to try to make it safer for people to ride their bikes along roadways or through neighborhoods. But which ones work best?

Friday, June 9, 2017

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