Transportation

ARCS awards go to 4 grad students

Calvin Clark, Xenia Wirth, Osvaldo Broesicke and Anna Skipper, who have each earned a scholarship from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation for 2017.

Osvaldo Broesicke, Calvin Clark, Anna Skipper and Xenia Wirth have each earned more funding from the Achievement Rewards for College Scientists Foundation to support their studies and open up opportunities to advance their research.

Thursday, September 7, 2017

WABE asks Watkins, do those neighborhood ‘slow down’ signs work?

WABE webpage for story featuring Kari Watkins, 'Do the "slow down" signs around Atlanta work?'

Atlanta NPR member station WABE used the unusual example of a Looney Tunes character dangling a “go slow” sign to illustrate what many neighborhoods in the city are doing: installing signs to encourage drivers to check their speed.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

New faculty member Sam Coogan connects civil and electrical engineering to run the transportation systems of tomorrow

Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

A new faculty member with one foot in electrical engineering and another in civil engineering is working to make sure the transportation systems of the future can accommodate all the different demands they will face, from self-driving cars to technologies we haven’t even imagined yet. Sam Coogan joins the Georgia Tech faculty this fall as an assistant professor in both the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Which bicycle infrastructure makes riders safer? Turns out, we don’t yet know

A bicyclist rides in a marked bike lane alongside a multi-lane road in Lutz, Florida. A new study of bicycle infrastructure from a team of School of Civil and Environmental Engineering researchers has found we don’t know much yet about how well bicycle infrastructure like these lanes protect riders. (Photo Courtesy: Daniel Oines via Flickr.)

Shared lane markings. Bike lanes painted a bright color. Bike boxes at intersections. Cycle tracks that provide physical barriers between bikes and cars. Communities have built these and other flavors of infrastructure to try to make it safer for people to ride their bikes along roadways or through neighborhoods. But which ones work best?

Friday, June 9, 2017

Grossman selected for summer DC fellowship at Eno Center

Ph.D. student Alice Grossman will spend 10 weeks in the nation’s capital this summer as a transportation policy fellow at the Eno Center for Transportation. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Ph.D. student Alice Grossman will spend 10 weeks in the nation’s capital this summer as a transportation policy fellow at the Eno Center for Transportation. Grossman begins work as the Thomas J. O’Bryant Transportation Policy and Finance Fellowship May 15.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Hunter tells GPB many more questions remain about self-driving cars

Screenshot of GPB web page featuring the March 16 segment on self-driving cars that included Michael Hunter.

Appearing on the GPB public radio program On Second Thought March 16, transportation research Michael Hunter said the jury remains out on whether autonomous vehicles will make our roads safer. Hunter said such questions are the focus of inquiry as cities and states move closer to allowing the driverless cars on their roadways.

Friday, March 17, 2017

Amoaning-Yankson invited to leadership conference as an Eno Fellow

The Eno Center for Transportation has selected Stephanie Amoaning-Yankson for its 2017 class of fellows. The fifth-year Ph.D. student will attend the center's Future Leaders Development Conference this summer to hear from federal officials, transportation policymakers, and business leaders. (Photo Courtesy: Stephanie Amoaning-Yankson)

Stephanie Amoaning-Yankson will continue a growing tradition for School of Civil and Environmental Engineering students when she attends the Eno Future Leaders Development Conference this summer.

Thursday, March 16, 2017

Sustainability, emissions, travel behavior among challenges researchers will tackle in 6 new University Transportation Centers

U.S. Department of Transportation map showing all of the newly funded University Transportation Centers and the affiliated universities.

The U.S. Department of Transportation announced Dec. 5 it would invest $300 million in new research through University Transportation Centers, including half a dozen where the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering will play a significant role.

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Watkins appointed the first Olmsted Junior Professor

Assistant Professor Kari Watkins added the title of Frederick L. Olmsted Junior Faculty Professor this summer, becoming the first faculty member to occupy the newly created position. Watkins studies multi-modal and sustainable transportation as well as using technology to improve transportation systems. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Kari Watkins has a new platform and new resources to use in pushing her vision of sustainable transportation for our communities. Watkins, a well-known face around Atlanta and an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been named to a new endowed position, the Frederick L. Olmsted Junior Faculty Professorship.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

Hunter: No ‘magic bullet’ for traffic tangles in Atlanta’s Perimeter area

Screen shot of Perimeter Center traffic solutions story featuring Michael Hunter.

No single solution will be able to untangle one of metro Atlanta’s worst areas for traffic, the Perimeter Center at the top end of Interstate 285. Rather, Associate Professor Michael Hunter suggested to the Sandy Springs Reporter, the area needs a combination of approaches, from public transit and corporate shuttles to multi-use trails and telecommuting.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

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