Faculty & Staff

NSF workshop sets out to define ‘bio-inspired geotechnics’ and lay groundwork for new collaborations

Alejandro Martinez welcomes engineers, biologists, physicists and others to the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics in May at the University of California, Davis. The unique gathering aimed to better define the emerging field of bio-inspired geotechnics and connect researchers from a broad range of disciplines to collaborate on groundbreaking ideas in the area. (Photo: Noah Pflueger-Peters/UC Davis)

A melting pot of experts with research interests as diverse as geotechnical engineering, termite burrowing, tree physiology, granular physics and soft robotics trickled in from around the world in late May for the First International Workshop on Bio-Inspired Geotechnics. The NSF-funded workshop brought together 60 experts from engineering and science research, as well as industry, to foster dialogue and collaborations to better establish the field of bio-inspired geotechnics.

Friday, June 14, 2019

AJC: New Tech center prepping for future where drones fly people over Atlanta traffic

Screenshot of Atlanta Journal-Constitution story "Could drones be the solution to Atlanta's traffic gridlock?" including a rendering of a city with a four-propeller Uber Eats drone flying above.

The first cities where drones could ferry people to and fro are the nation’s largest and most-congested — places like Los Angeles. But a new research center at Georgia Tech aims to answer the key questions about what’s called urban and regional air mobility, and turn Atlanta into a test bed for the emerging technology along the way.

Monday, May 27, 2019

New tool will give large concrete structures what amounts to an ultrasound, finding tiny cracks before they grow

A researcher measures the width of a crack in a reinforced concrete column after testing the strength of the column. A new project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Research Projects Agency will develop a field-deployable tool to detect cracks far smaller than this — and inside rather than outside — thick reinforced concrete structures. (Photo: Chris Kiser)

Imagine giving large concrete structures something similar to an ultrasound and getting images so detailed you can see cracks just a tenth of a millimeter long. That level of detail just isn’t possible now. Yet such capability could revolutionize how engineers assess the health of thick reinforced concrete infrastructure like dams and power plants and bridges.

Thursday, May 23, 2019

Mechanical engineering society elevates Paulino to fellow

Raymond Allen Jones Chair Glaucio Paulino looks leftward and smiles. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Glaucio Paulino has been elected a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, a recognition of his achievements that’s reserved for less than 4% of the society’s members.

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Your carbon footprint is probably higher than you thought, thanks to methane leaking from natural gas systems

Natual gas storage tanks with excess methane burning off. (Photo Courtesy: Jeffrey Phillips via Flickr)

If you're someone who looks at the carbon footprint of the things you buy, you could be significantly underestimating your impact on the environment.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Jacobs’ nondestructive evaluation work earns lifetime achievement honor

Professor and Associate Dean Laurence Jacobs, left, accepts a lifetime achievement award in nondestructive evaluation from Tribikram Kundu at the SPIE Smart Structures and Nondestructive Evaluation Symposium in early March. (Photo Courtesy: Laurence Jacobs and SPIE)

An international organization dedicated to advancing light-based research and technology has given Laurence Jacobs a lifetime achievement award for his work on nondestructive evaluation.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Stewart earns tenure, Baker promoted to full professor

Lauren Stewart and Nelson Baker, who both have earned promotions.

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart has earned tenure at Georgia Tech and been promoted to associate professor, effective in August.

Thursday, March 14, 2019

Maritime journal editor: Paper on shippers’ reluctance to use Northern Sea Route the year’s top research

Cargo ship loaded with freight containers at sea with a muted, gray sky. (Photo Courtesy: Mike Baird via Flickr)

Even with more ice melted for longer periods of the year, freight companies still would be hesitant to use a shorter shipping route through the Arctic Ocean. That assessment of decision-makers’ attitudes and the potential use of what’s become known as the Northern Sea Route has won the 2018 Editor’s Choice Award from the journal Maritime Economics & Logistics.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Stewart, Watkins and a baker’s dozen alumnae make list of influential women in Georgia engineering

Top 100 Influential Women in Georgia graphic from Engineering Georgia magazine, including headshots of many of the women on the list.

Georgia Tech civil and environmental engineers are well represented on Engineering Georgia’s second annual list of the 100 most influential women in Georgia. Faculty members Lauren Stewart and Kari Watkins made the list, along with 13 other women who studied in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Koon elected to National Academy of Engineering

Professor of the Practice John Koon talks teaches his Senior Design class on a recent Thursday. Koon is one of the newest members of the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest honors for the nation's engineers. (Photo: Amelia Neumeister)

An hour after the National Academy of Engineering announced John Koon was one of its newest members, he was doing what he does every Thursday: teaching his Senior Design course. Never mind that election to the NAE is one of the most prestigious honors — perhaps THE most prestigious — an engineer can receive.

Friday, February 8, 2019

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