Faculty & Staff

National Academy invites Konstantinidis to join young leaders at Arab-American Frontiers symposium

Professor Kostas Konstantinidis, who will attend the 2018 Arab-American Frontiers of Science, Engineering and Medicine at the invitation of the National Academy of Science. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

Kostas Konstantinidis will join a select group of outstanding engineers, scientists and medical professionals in Kuwait this fall at the invitation of the National Academy of Science and the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science.

Thursday, September 13, 2018

Peeta delivers public transportation keynote at global mobility summit

Srinivas Peeta, the Frederick R. Dickerson Chair in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo: Luke Xinjing Xu)

Srinivas Peeta will join transportation ministers and tech and transportation industry leaders at a two-day summit in India later this week to create game-changing approaches to transportation.

Thursday, September 6, 2018

How much water is used to fulfill the energy needs of the US?

Power poles stretch into a bright sun with mist hovering just above the ground.

To generate the energy delivered to each home, business and industrial user in the United States each year, trillions of gallons of water are required for energy production, processing, conversion and transport. However, the exact amount of water withdrawn from the environment and consumed for each energy source has never been quantified — until now.

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Tien, Lee win top paper award at Resilience Week 2018

Graduate student Cynthia Lee, left, and Assistant Professor Iris Tien with their first-place infrastructure paper aware at Resilience Week 2018. (Photo Courtesy: Iris Tien)

Two Georgia Tech researchers have won the first-place paper award in infrastructure at Resilience Week 2018 for their work using a variety of data sources to better understand and design infrastructure systems.

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Genomic study of 412 anthrax strains provides new clues about why some strains are more virulent than others

A photomicrographic view of Bacillus anthracis bacteria taken from heart blood and processed using a carbol-fuchsin stain. (Image Courtesy: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

By analyzing genomic sequences from more than 400 strains of the bacterium that causes anthrax, researchers have provided the first evidence that the severity — technically known as virulence — of specific strains may be related to the number of copies of certain plasmids they carry. Plasmids are genetic structures of the cell that can reproduce independently, and are responsible for producing the anthrax toxin and other virulence factors.

Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Cho is construction group’s distinguished professor of the year

Associate Professor Yong Cho with his Distinguished Professor award from the Construction Industry Institute. (Photo Courtesy: Construction Industry Institute)

A consortium of construction firms has named Yong Cho its distinguished professor for 2018, recognizing his commitment to incorporating the latest industry research in his courses.

Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Our autonomous transportation future: New Dickerson Chair Srinivas Peeta and the human-vehicle-infrastructure connections to make that future a reality

Srinivas Peeta, the new Frederick R. Dickerson Chair in the School of CIvil and Environmental Engineering. (Photo Luke Xinjing Xu)

The world of fully autonomous vehicles is inevitable, according to one of the newest faculty members in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The question is, how do we get there with the right policies and investments — and without so many bumps in the road that public trust erodes along the way.

Thursday, August 23, 2018

New faces: Macedo driven to understand geotechnical risks and make cities more resilient, sustainable

Assistant Professor Jorge Macedo

Though they’re relatively rare, the consequences of disasters like earthquakes, flooding and landslides are dire — and growing. Just ask Jorge Macedo, who thinks a lot about the risks to people, communities and engineering systems from those kinds of extreme events.

Wednesday, August 22, 2018

USG names Rodgers a Regents Researcher

Michael Rodgers, principal research scientist in the school and now a Regents Researcher. (Photo: Joshua Stewart)

Michael Rodgers received the University System of Georgia’s highest research recognition August 14 when the Board of Regents named him a Regents Researcher.

Monday, August 20, 2018

Burns named associate chair of admin and finance, Haas takes over leadership of undergrad programs

Susan Burns, the new associate chair for administration and finance, and Kevin Haas, the new associate chair for undergraduate programs.

Karen and John Huff School Chair Donald Webster announced that Susan Burns will be the new associate chair for administration and finance, and Kevin Haas will take over Burns’ former role as associate chair for undergraduate programs.

Friday, August 3, 2018

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