Faculty & Staff

Tien wins award for helping bring engineering concepts to middle school science lessons

Iris Tien, left, with Gwinnett County middle school teacher Kathylee McElroy and Jamila Cola after Tien and McElroy won awards for their collaboration on engineering lesson plans for McElroy's science classes. They've been working together for two years through a program made possible by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research, Innovation, and Multi-Scale Engineering. Cola is the director of that program. (Photo Courtesy: Iris Tien)

Georgia Tech’s K-12 outreach program has recognized Assistant Professor Iris Tien for her work helping some Atlanta-area middle school students learn about engineering.

Monday, August 29, 2016

New year brings new faces to CEE classrooms

Rudy Bonparte and John Taylor, two of the new faces in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering this fall.

Several new faces are joining the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering faculty this fall, bringing hard-earned experience from the real-world and new areas of research prowess to the School.

Monday, August 22, 2016

Watkins appointed the first Olmsted Junior Professor

Assistant Professor Kari Watkins added the title of Frederick L. Olmsted Junior Faculty Professor this summer, becoming the first faculty member to occupy the newly created position. Watkins studies multi-modal and sustainable transportation as well as using technology to improve transportation systems. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Kari Watkins has a new platform and new resources to use in pushing her vision of sustainable transportation for our communities. Watkins, a well-known face around Atlanta and an assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been named to a new endowed position, the Frederick L. Olmsted Junior Faculty Professorship.

Thursday, August 11, 2016

‘From Haiti to California’: DesRoches to deliver UC Davis distinguished lecture

Reginald DesRoches stands with the ruptured cinder block wall one of his Ph.D. students destroyed while testing different kinds of masonry infill designed to strengthen similar structures in the Caribbean. DesRoches will draw on decades of earthquake research like this for the University of California, Davis, College of Engineering distinguished lecture he'll deliver in September. (Photo: Rob Felt)

The University of California, Davis, College of Engineering has invited Karen and John Huff School Chair Reginald DesRoches to deliver the college’s distinguished lecture this fall.

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

Hunter: No ‘magic bullet’ for traffic tangles in Atlanta’s Perimeter area

Screen shot of Perimeter Center traffic solutions story featuring Michael Hunter.

No single solution will be able to untangle one of metro Atlanta’s worst areas for traffic, the Perimeter Center at the top end of Interstate 285. Rather, Associate Professor Michael Hunter suggested to the Sandy Springs Reporter, the area needs a combination of approaches, from public transit and corporate shuttles to multi-use trails and telecommuting.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Water Resources Research editors say Bras’ work some of the year’s most significant

A study by Rafael L. Bras advancing the modeling of river watershed evolution in semi-arid areas has been named an Editor’s Choice by the journal Water Resources Research.

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Burns named one of Tech’s emerging leaders

Susan Burns

Associate Chair Susan Burns will participate in a new program this fall designed to prepare a handful of Georgia Tech faculty members for future leadership on campus and in academia. Burns is one of only 16 faculty members selected for the nine-month program’s inaugural class.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Understanding landslide-generated tsunamis — and predicting their impact

A simulated landslide splashes into a wave basin at Oregon State University.

Scientists better understand the formation of rare but deadly kinds of tsunamis as a result of first-of-their-kind experiments by two Georgia Tech researchers.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Understanding rogue ocean waves may be simple after all

A large wave towers astern of the NOAA ship Delaware II in the Atlantic Ocean in 2005. (Photo: Delaware II Crew/NOAA)

An international team of scientists has developed a relatively simple mathematical explanation for the rogue ocean waves that can develop seemingly out of nowhere to sink ships and overwhelm oil platforms with walls of water as much as 25 meters high.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

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