Faculty & Staff

Maritime journal editor: Paper on shippers’ reluctance to use Northern Sea Route the year’s top research

Cargo ship loaded with freight containers at sea with a muted, gray sky. (Photo Courtesy: Mike Baird via Flickr)

Even with more ice melted for longer periods of the year, freight companies still would be hesitant to use a shorter shipping route through the Arctic Ocean. That assessment of decision-makers’ attitudes and the potential use of what’s become known as the Northern Sea Route has won the 2018 Editor’s Choice Award from the journal Maritime Economics & Logistics.

Monday, March 4, 2019

Stewart, Watkins and a baker’s dozen alumnae make list of influential women in Georgia engineering

Top 100 Influential Women in Georgia graphic from Engineering Georgia magazine, including headshots of many of the women on the list.

Georgia Tech civil and environmental engineers are well represented on Engineering Georgia’s second annual list of the 100 most influential women in Georgia. Faculty members Lauren Stewart and Kari Watkins made the list, along with 13 other women who studied in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Friday, February 22, 2019

Koon elected to National Academy of Engineering

Professor of the Practice John Koon talks teaches his Senior Design class on a recent Thursday. Koon is one of the newest members of the National Academy of Engineering, one of the highest honors for the nation's engineers. (Photo: Amelia Neumeister)

An hour after the National Academy of Engineering announced John Koon was one of its newest members, he was doing what he does every Thursday: teaching his Senior Design course. Never mind that election to the NAE is one of the most prestigious honors — perhaps THE most prestigious — an engineer can receive.

Friday, February 8, 2019

Messners launch $5M faculty endowment challenge

Michael and Jenny Messner. (Photo Courtesy: The Messners)

Longtime School of Civil and Environmental Engineering supporters Jenny and Michael Messner have made a transformational donation that will match $5 million in gifts that support the School’s faculty.

Friday, January 25, 2019

Crittenden to receive ASCE’s Freese Award for his work solving water quality problems

Professor John Crittenden

The American Society of Civil Engineers has named John Crittenden the recipient of the 2020 Simon W. Freese Environmental Engineering Award and Lecture, recognizing "extraordinary accomplishments" in solving challenging water quality problems.

Thursday, January 24, 2019

India’s top engineering college honors Peeta as distinguished alumnus

Frederick R. Dickerson Chair Srinivas Peeta (Photo: Luke Xinjing Xu)

Srinivas Peeta’s career trajectory has not gone unnoticed at his undergraduate college. The institution has named him a Distinguished Alumnus, an award reserved each year for a small handful of graduates from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras.

Thursday, January 10, 2019

Webster elected a sustaining fellow of international aquatic sciences society

Karen and John Huff School Chair Donald Webster. (Photo: Jess Hunt-Ralston)

The Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography has named Donald Webster to its 2018 class of sustaining fellows for his service to the organization and the aquatic sciences.

Monday, December 17, 2018

Op-Ed: Will driverless cars make our traffic problems worse?

An autonomous Waymo Chrysler Pacifica drives around Los Altos, California. (Photo Courtesy: Dllu via Wikimedia Commons)

Kari Watkins and Michael Hunter published an essay in Newsweek Dec. 10 asking a provocative question about our autonomous transportation future. Namely: Is it possible the widespread adoption of driverless cars will worsen traffic congestion rather than make it better?

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly

Silver dipoles are arranged across the folds of a Miuri-Ori pattern to create a radio frequency filter that’s tunable. By adjusting the dimensions, the filter can block a wide range of frequencies. (Photo: Rob Felt)

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies.

Tuesday, December 11, 2018

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