Faculty & Staff

Understanding landslide-generated tsunamis — and predicting their impact

A simulated landslide splashes into a wave basin at Oregon State University.

Scientists better understand the formation of rare but deadly kinds of tsunamis as a result of first-of-their-kind experiments by two Georgia Tech researchers.

Monday, June 27, 2016

Understanding rogue ocean waves may be simple after all

A large wave towers astern of the NOAA ship Delaware II in the Atlantic Ocean in 2005. (Photo: Delaware II Crew/NOAA)

An international team of scientists has developed a relatively simple mathematical explanation for the rogue ocean waves that can develop seemingly out of nowhere to sink ships and overwhelm oil platforms with walls of water as much as 25 meters high.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

GEOSTRATA magazine profiles ‘GeoLegend’ Paul Mayne

Professor Paul Mayne

Paul Mayne is the featured ‘GeoLegend’ in the May/June 2016 issue of GEOSTRATA, the magazine of the American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute.

Monday, June 20, 2016

Tracking the Atlanta Streetcar in real time

The Atlanta Streetcar near the original Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta. Georgia Tech researchers have developed a way to improve the timing of the streetcar, eliminating the need for schedules and reducing passenger wait time. (Photo: Spmarshall42 / Wikimedia Commons)

Starting this summer, the Atlanta Streetcar will begin using a new real-time dispatching method developed at Georgia Tech that eliminates the need for schedules and cuts down on passenger wait times.

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Haitian Roundtable recognizes DesRoches as one of 2016's change-making Haitian-Americans

The Haitian Roundtable's 2016 1804 List of Changemakers and Ones to Watch.

A group of Haitian-American professionals has recognized Reginald DesRoches as one of the country’s outstanding leaders making an impact in their field and on their island homeland. The Haitian Roundtable released its 1804 List May 18, including DesRoches as one of 25 “changemakers.”

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

A Booming Career

Assistant Professor Lauren Stewart in her lab.

Walking toward Lauren Stewart’s office, you immediately smell the odor of glue in the air. A quick glance around reveals model bridges in various states of completion lying about a student work area as harried undergraduates work to finish class assignments. Stewart, an assistant professor in civil and environmental engineering, teaches a beginning structures course, so this is a recurrent theme each semester. Stewart herself, however, is more at home with the smell of explosives and destruction rather than construction.

Monday, April 11, 2016

Arson earns tenure, promotion to associate professor

Chloe Arson

Chloe Arson becomes an associate professor with tenure, effective August 15. Georgia Tech President G.P. “Bud” Peterson recommended the promotion and awarding Arson tenure a few weeks ago.

Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Air Force selects Stewart for summer faculty fellowship program

Lauren Stewart in her lab. (Photo: Gary Meek)

Lauren Stewart will spend some of her summer at Eglin Air Force Base in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida, working to better understand how military components react when they strike a “hardened target.” Stewart has received a summer faculty fellowship from the Air Force Research Lab.

Friday, March 25, 2016

Bacteria in the pipes: Study identifies the hard-to-detect microbes in hospital shower hoses

Growth of Mycobacterium isolated on a plate of culture medium. (Photo: Stacey Pfaller, EPA)

The human microbiome, a diverse collection of microorganisms living inside us and on our skin, has attracted considerable attention for its role in a broad range of human health issues. Now, researchers are discovering that the built environment also has a microbiome, which includes a community of potentially-pathogenic bacteria living inside water supply pipes. A paper published March 11 in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology describes microbial communities found in shower hoses at a major U.S. hospital. The study documented bacteria – and related genes – using cutting-edge metagenomic techniques that allow the characterization of organisms that cannot be detected using traditional culture-based microbiology assays.

Monday, March 14, 2016

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